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Some Concepts Before You Start Coding Node.JS

This article will help you grasp different concepts behind Node.js and will empower you to create production-ready applications.

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient.

We have all read the above statement, but what does it really mean? Let us understand how traditional server models used to work.

In a traditional server model, for each request to the server, a thread is spawned to handle the same request. This type of implementation doesn’t scale much, as the number of multiple requests your server can handle is directly proportional to the number of threads your machine can spawn.

In Node, a process consists of one main thread of execution, and a myriad of background threads (typically performing I/O work). Coordination between the background threads and the main thread is performed using a queue. The main thread pulls tasks from the queue (enqueued in the order they were received) and executes them.

In short, some of the few benefits of using Node.js are listed below:

  • Reduces development time.

But there are some cases where you shouldn’t use Node.js.

Before actually coding in Node.js, I would like to mention some of the core concepts of Javascript which allow Node.js to work the way it does.


1. Higher Order Functions

This might be a very common thing for any JS developer, but someone who is new to JS might find this weird. In JS, you can pass a function as a parameter to another function. Let us understand this with a simple example.

function speak(name, callback) {
  alert(`${name} threw a boomerang few years ago`);
  callback();
}
function sayWhat(){
  alert('Now he lives in fear!');
}
speak('Pankaj', sayWhat);

In the above example, the function sayWhat was passed to speak function.


2. Callbacks

In the above example we already saw callback in use. The following statement halts the code execution.

alert(`${name} threw a boomerang few years ago`);

Once you close the alert, the method which was passed is being called. This is called a callback.


3. Event Loop

All the function calls are put into a call stack on LIFO basis. The event loop continuously checks the call stack to see if there’s any function that needs to run. While doing so, it adds any function call it finds to the call stack and executes each one in order.

Let us take a practical approach to understanding event loop. First run the code below.

function first(){
  console.log('First Function, So Wow!!'); // 1
}
function second(){
  console.log('Second Function, So Wow Wow!!'); //2
}
console.log('Hello World!'); // 3
first();
second();
console.log('Callbacks are cool '); // 4

The above code will work as expected. 3 → 1 → 2 → 4

function first(){
  console.log('First callback, So Wow!!'); // 1
}
function second(){
  console.log('Second callback, So Wow Wow!!'); // 2
}
console.log('Welcome to the meetup'); // 3
setTimeout(first,0);
second();
console.log('Callbacks are cool'); //4

The result for a minimum setTimeout calls the function which is passed as a parameter after the time mentioned in the second parameter. As the time is mentioned as 0, you might think the output to be 3 → 1 → 2 → 4. But because of the way event loops work, it is actually 3 → 2→ 4 → 1.

Cheap Umbraco 7.4.2 Hosting Recommendation

Best, Cheap and Reliable PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting Provider

PrestaShop is an open source e-commerce solution that is used freely by more than 120,000 online stores worldwide. It comes with over 275 features being carefully developed in order to increase business owners’ sales with minimal efforts required. All the software features are absolutely free.

PrestaShop is free software as it’s specified in the GNU General Public License and officially started in August 2007 for small and medium-size businesses. The software, based on the Smartly template engine, nowadays is used by more than 100,000 shops all over the world.

PrestaShop has a good record and even was awarded the title of the Best Open Source E-Commerce Application in the Packt 2010 Open Source Awards and the Best Open Source Business Application in the 2011 Open Source Awards.

It supports various payment systems such as PayPal, Google Checkout, Payments Pro via API, Authorize.net and Skrill. It is used on Apache web server 1.3 or later, with PHP 5 or later and MySQL 5 running on it.

About 41 languages are available to different degrees, but only English and French have full support in all the versions. In the admin panel AJAX is used extensively in the software. Module blocks can be added easily to the online store to supply with extra functionality.

Think of managing a dynamic product list at the PrestaShop back-office: administrative interface helps you manage with one-click most complex inventory updates. PrestaShop has a one-page checkout, provides customers with a great number of options to view the chosen products, reliable shipping options along with control logistics ( fees, shipping restrictions, weight and many more) and the ability to attach custom messages. So you can see that PrestaShop will do its best to simplify and make more comfortable customers’ work. When speaking about defying taxes according to customer’s localization, PrestaShop has an advanced tracking system as well as customizable exchange rates. The customers can also choose the preferred currency.

New Features in PrestaShop 1.7.6.3

After a few months dedicated to fixing all regressions found on the previous 1.7.6 versions, PrestaShop 1.7.6.3 is finally available!

1.7.6.3 is available!

This maintenance release fixes 16 issues reported on versions 1.7.6.0, 1.7.6.1, and 1.7.6.2.

Obviously, you should upgrade your shop quickly in order to benefit from those fixes – and do not forget to backup before. 😉

Regression fixes

Below are listed all the regression issues fixed in this version:

  • Unclear error notifications about the number of characters allowed on both following pages:
    • Advanced Parameters > Team > Profiles (#16725)
    • Catalog > Categories > Edit (#16514)
  • Cost price & unit price sections on a product sheet do not save the changes (#16353)
  • When I install a new language, emails are not translated at the first generation (#16273)
  • Quickview and product flags bug (#16633)
  • Wrong encoding for viewed products (#16739)
  • Currency translatable fields empty in webservice 1.7.6.1 (#16760)
  • Customers export from the BO – Wrong 50 limit (#16328)
  • Error in mails/it/order_customer_comment.html (#16829)
  • Missing chart in Shop Search stats for new employees (#16730)
  • Dashboard – customer link not working 1.7.6.1 (#16460)
  • Can’t enable/disable Newsletter option & Enabled option when the field “Partner offers” is required (#16509)
  • PrestaShop’s front office should be displayed right-to-left when in Arabic (#17245)

Important changes

Below are security changes we added in this version:

  • Quick access error when having a wrong url (#17050)
  • Protect modules vendor folder on install/upgrade/enable (#17036)

Are you looking for Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Cheap and Reliable PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting

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10 GB Bandwidth 10 GB Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
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Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap and Reliable PrestaShop v1.7.6.3 Hosting?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 4.4.2 Hosting

Best Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting Recommendation

Joomla is one of the most popular free content management systems (CMS) in the world that allows you to easily create and manage a dynamic website. It has an intuitive management interface to control all the features and functionality this powerful CMS possesses. Furthermore, there are hundreds of free extensions written for Joomla that allows users to extend its functionality and customize it to their own objectives. Joomla Content Management System is supported by a large and friendly community where newbies could really rely on assistance from more experienced members.

The Joomla Web CMS is considered to be a popular choice for many types of websites, including corporate sites, news or blogs, government applications, small business sites and sites where secure logins are required. The ecosystem of Joomla developers and users provide products and services to the Joomla community which has more than one-half million members and more than 20,000 developers.

Joomla! 3.9.15 is now available. The Joomla! Project and the Production Leadership Team are proud to announce the release of Joomla! 3.9.15 as the latest in the 3.x series. Introducing 34 new features, including support for the recently released PHP 7 scripting language, which significantly increases web site speed.

Joomla 3.9.15

Joomla 3.9.15 is now available. This is a security release for the 3.x series of Joomla which addresses three low security vulnerabilities and contains over 20 bug fixes and improvements.

What’s in 3.9.15?

Joomla 3.9.15 includes three security vulnerability fixes and addresses several bugs, including:

Security Issues Fixed

  • Low Priority – Core – CSRF in batch actions (affecting Joomla 3.0.0 through 3.9.14)
  • Low Priority – Core – CSRF com_templates LESS compiler (affecting Joomla 3.0.0 through 3.9.14)
  • Low Priority – Core – XSS in com_actionlogs (affecting Joomla 3.9.0 through 3.9.14)

Bug fixes and Improvements

  • Beez Template: Fix the consent field modal #23205
  • Action Log emails: Use of absolute URLs #27432
  • TinyMCE fixes: #27498 #27519
  • User email addresses: Case insensitive management #24117
  • Prevent library extensions to overwrite core files #27300

Are you looking for Best Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting? Finding a high quality Best Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your Joomla 3.9.15 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Best Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Best Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting Recommendation

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Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
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Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap Joomla 3.9.15 Hosting Recommendation

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap MediaWiki 1.26.2 Hosting Recommendation

Step-By-Step SEO for Ecommerce Websites

Why is SEO Important for E-Commerce?

Gaining new customers can be hard, especially if you’re not being found by search engines. And, with 44% of online shoppers beginning their search with a search engine,  you’re going to want to hop on the SEO bandwagon. Why? Well, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce, e-commerce sales in 2015 were $341.7 billion for the year. That’s a 14.6% increase compared to 2014s $298.3 billion. The report went on further to note that online sales were 7.3% of total retail sales in 2015, versus 6.4% in 2014.

Still not convinced to use SEO for e-commerce? Kissmetrics saw that 30.5% of all traffic to Yotpo’s database was coming from organic searches on Google, Bing, Yahoo, and other search engines. Or, check out Ahrefs case study on Australia-based toy company, ToyUniverse. Ahrefs saw an increase in organic traffic by 116% through SEO efforts. And, let’s not forget about SEMrush’s double jeopardy technique to increase site traffic by 1780%.

1. Keyword Research

Every 60 seconds, 700,000 Google searches are performed. That’s a lot. And, want to hear something even crazier? The average consumer processes 100,500 digital words on a daily basis. So, with all this information, how do you make sure customers find you in the search engines?

To reach your consumers, you must start with a targeted keyword list.

As you may expect, creating keyword lists are a must-have when getting any new client or preparing your site. I admit I’m overjoyed that keyword stuffing is a thing of the past, and I fully support long-tail keyword terms and writing high-quality content surrounding those long-tail terms.

2. Site Architecture

Ecommerce brands, listen up: If you’ve been looking for an excuse to revamp your website, this may be it. Site architecture (or how you organize your site) is crucial for all e-commerce sites. Mostly due to the fact most e-commerce websites have millions of product pages.

The site architecture allows you to map out how the user flows through your website. As the website owner, you want the user to be able to quickly identify key pages and the relationships between the pages.

Before building your navigation and site structure, walk-through this mind-mapping process.

Step one: Ask yourself these questions:

  1. What search queries do consumers use before they get to your site?
  2. What search queries do consumers use once they’re on your site?
  3. What pages on your website get the most traffic?
  4. What are your top exit pages?

Step two: Decide if the drop-down menus are something you’d like to incorporate in your navigation bar.

If you decide to move forward with the drop down menu (as most sites do) make sure you’re using HTML. This is a common mistake I see when working on e-commerce sites. Search engines cannot find your navigation unless it’s written in HTML. Also, keep in mind you don’t want to go link crazy. Moz recommends 100 links per page max.

Step three: Use your head keyword terms (as discussed above) to decide what you want to name your category pages.

I would recommend using this head keyword term in your page title, header, and include it in the top 200-word paragraph.

Step four: If you’re using filters (as most e-commerce sites with 20 products or more on a page do), pay close attention to your URL parameters.

Funky URL parameters can cause duplicate content.

Step five: Add breadcrumbs to your product pages to give users and the search engines another opportunity to see where your product fits on your site.

Another cool thing about breadcrumbs? Sometimes Google will show your breadcrumbs instead of your URL.

3. Technical SEO

Technical SEO will forever be in my heart (and web redesign queues). And if you’re an e-commerce business, technical SEO will forever be on your marketing calendar. The technical SEO is no longer simply about sitemaps and meta tags. As the lines between technical SEO and on-site SEO continue to blur, it’s easier than ever to build a website with clean URLs, correct internal linking, and most importantly, without any stacked redirects.

If you’ve found your website is lacking in the technical SEO department, you’ll be surprised at just how far a few simple updates can go. By inserting canonical tags and switching up homepage internal links for the right content, you’ll realize that technical SEO can improve just about any site, e-commerce or not.

Let’s dive into some of the technical SEO ideas that will you bring your site from sad-face to smiley-face emoji in 😍 no time.

Step One: Implement Schema Markup

Wouldn’t life be great if Google solved our daily “my site isn’t getting found” dilemma? Well, with rich snippets or schema markup, you’re able to highlight specific pieces of information for Google and other search engines.

There are two types of schema markup you’re going to want to add to your e-commerce website. Each of these has their attributes.

Step Two: Clean Up URLs

Visualize the pages of your website. Now think about how much of it your users actually navigate to. For many of us, the discrepancy between pretty, clean URL structures and dynamic URLs is extreme. It’s hardly surprising, considering how quickly we assign a sentimental value to our URL structure — and forget about what’s best for our site. But having a disorganized URL structure can be a major pain to your consumers, especially when you have hoards of product pages and categories.

Step Three: Switch to HTTPS if You’re Still an HTTP

With so much private information like credit card numbers, passwords, and home addresses at their disposal, e-commerce website owners have become the forefront for HTTPS. It’s so important for e-commerce that Shopify allowed users to activate their SSL certifications at no additional charge.

So, what’s the difference between HTTP and HTTPS?

HTTPS (Secure HyperText Transfer Protocol) is essentially HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol). It’s just a more secure version. Like HTTP, HTTPS allows the browser to begin a connection to the server on a standard port. However, HTTPS then adds a layer of security using SSL (Secure Socket Layers) to transfer data. This helps to avoid damages by third parties and keeps data encrypted.

On top of the bonus security features that HTTPS offers, HTTPS is also a ranking factor. Google announced in 2014 that sites offering a secure site through HTTPS would experience higher ranking benefits.

Step Four: Redirect 404 Pages

Even if you’re not the type to work up to your zero 404 errors in Google Search Console (or know what that means—no shame), it’s still a great idea to do some cleaning and redirecting of your dead pages. After all, Google is all about user experience.

If a product is no longer available and you delete that page, your potential consumer might receive a 404 page. Not cool. Redirecting users with a 301 redirect—or, permanent redirect—is the best route to go. This 301 redirect passes around 90% of link love. So, for example, if your old product was ranking well for specific keyword terms, 90% of that will pass to the new page.

I try to steer clear of 302 redirects—temporary redirects—mostly because it sends us 0% link love.

If you do get stuck with a large amount of 404 errors, I recommend creating a custom 404 page. This will create a better user experience and contain a link to the previous page the user was on. You can also add a fun message.

Step Five: Implement Pagination

You’ve heard it time and again: Infinite scrolling equals a better user experience. And it’s true. However, infinite scrolling is not ideal for usability and negatively affects your search results on desktop and mobile.  But, as simple as it seems, there are a lot of opinions out there on what works best for e-commerce.

In a recent study by the Baymard Institute, they break down pagination vs. the “load more” button vs. infinite scrolling. In my eyes, this seems to be SEO (Team Pagination) vs. UX designer (Team Infinite Scrolling).

Step Six: Canonicalize Products

Figuring out what and how to canonicalize your e-commerce site is one of those mundane parts of maintaining a website that no one warns you about. Sure, you can publish a new product any time (and sometimes you do!), but being in charge of your canonicalization every day can get overwhelming.

Step Seven: Cross-link your top pages.

Chances are, unless you’ve spent time googling how to internal link as an e-commerce site, you’ve seen the power internal linking can have on your website. While this process is quite common among SEOs, it can often be forgotten for newbies.

When you think of internal linking, you probably think of hyperlinking a keyword term to some slightly relevant page on your website or excessively linking to too many pages on your site. That’s not what I’m talking about. Internal linking allows you to guide the user from one page on your site to another. This improves user engagement and navigation.

Step Eight: Create a sitemap.

An XML (Extensible Markup Language) sitemap creates a readable format of your site for search engines. XML sitemaps are a list of the URLs on your website.

If you’re an e-commerce site with lots of pages, it’s time to get familiar with XML sitemaps. Google states you can list up to 50,000 files in one sitemap. So, unless you’re Amazon or Microsoft, you might be able to get away with just one sitemap. However, when I’m working on e-commerce sites, I like to break down my sitemaps into different sections.

Step Nine: Optimize for mobile.

With the launch of Google AMP pages and Google announcing mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal, I think it’s safe to say that if you’re not on board with mobile optimization by now, then you’ll be left on page 50 of Google’s search results. And, you’ve probably noticed a trend on your site with mobile driving more traffic to your site than other avenues.

Step Ten: Page speed.

If you manage a website, you know that improving page speed can be difficult to crack down. In fact, every website owner you know can probably recall an instance (or ten) when your site wasn’t loading fast enough. Luckily, there are tools you can use now to help guide us through this process.

4. On-Site SEO

I don’t know about you, but when I get to on-page SEO, I tend to optimize a full product category (or two) with a whole lot more than just the title tag and description tag. In fact, there’s a whole land of overlooked potential in the on-site SEO section—it’s just taken me a while to tap into it. But, I’m majorly glad I did. If you’re living in the ’90s, you may think that long-tail keyword terms and on-site SEO don’t mix, but I’m here to prove otherwise.

Let’s take a look at what I see as a fully on-site SEO optimized e-commerce page. As Beyonce would say, flawless.

Sure, it may sound simple. I searched near and far and narrowed it down to these essential on-page SEO elements that never disappoint. And, if you have a favorite that didn’t make the list, let me know in the comments — I’m always looking for an excuse to meta-tag-stalk brands.

URL

We’ve all heard the same URL advice over and over again: A keyword-rich URL and a unique, clean, short structure will get you far. True, but what happens when your site gets so big you have to add parameters? Search engines do have the ability to ignore these ugly parameters (ex:?%20), but having a descriptive URL gives you yet another opportunity to improve user experience and increase rankings.

Meta Title

I love nothing more than when my meta titles increase my click-through rate. It could be something as (not-so) subtle as my keyword placement or simply reinforcing brand value. But one of my favorite talking points speaks to the idea of adding action words to our meta titles. These action words can help you target more long-tail keyword terms, which is always a bonus.

Meta Description

As click-through rate becomes an increasingly important factor in SEO (as Paul Haahr, Google Ranking Engineer stated at SMX West) it’s vital that e-commerce brands learn how to optimize their title tags to boost CTR. Let me be clear; your meta description may not improve your search rankings alone, but it will earn you more clicks when optimized correctly.

Body Copy

You’ve probably heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” As heart-rending as that thought is, as an SEO consultant, I happen to believe there’s truth to this adage. And, it couldn’t be more applicable than with SEO—the land of competing keywords, A/B targeting headline titles, high-stake conversions, and impressionable consumers.

Internal Links

A show of hands: Who’s already putting internal links on their product pages? Yes, friends, it’s true: Internal linking on your product pages is necessary.  Strategically linking from high-authority pages to high-priority product and category pages are typically already done on your homepage and blog page.

Social Media Share Buttons

We all know you need to be active on social media for your business. But, do you need social media share buttons on your product pages? The short answer: Yes. Social media share buttons give you the potential for free promotion on social channels. And, while social media doesn’t directly affect your rankings in the search engines, having a product that is often shared and an engaging page does help your rankings.

Images

I’m going to say it: A beautiful image is nothing without ALT tags. There it is. Just because you spent $20k on a photo shoot with a world-renowned photographer doesn’t mean anything if you don’t properly tag your images. Your images will never appear in search.

Product Videos

You click on the tees category on your favorite store’s website. You keep scrolling. You get to the product you’ve been looking for, and you can see your soon-to-be-new-favorite tee in video format. You are living it before you buy it. Awesome, right?

Animoto found that 73% of consumers were more likely to buy a product or sign up for a service if they watch a branded video that explains the product. Quicksprout discovered that video could drive 12% of users to buy the product. And Digiday stated that 52% of consumers said watching videos makes them more confident about their purchase decisions. Think video is worth an investment yet?

In addition to increasing conversion rates, adding product videos to your website can help improve search engine rankings. Video increases engagement and time on-site, therefore increasing your chances for ranking your product pages higher in the SERPs.  Videos also give you an opportunity to differentiate yourself from your competitors.

Conclusion

Now it’s time for you to implement the tactics from this step-by-step guide.

Cheap Drupal 8.0.5 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap Drupal 8.8.2 Hosting Provider Recommendation

Drupal is a free community supported framework for creating, organizing, presenting and managing a website. It powers millions of websites and applications from all over the world. Drupal makes it easy for contributors to publish to websites and easy for developers to deploy new sites as well as add features to existing ones. Most commonly referred to as a content management system, or CMS, Drupal has much more to offer. Drupal installations include a set of modules called Core Components, which provide features such as user management, menu systems, and user contributed content.

The Drupal open source community (one of the largest in the world) contributes and supports thousands of free flexible and robust modules and themes, which can be easily integrated into websites to offer powerful features such as multimedia, calendars, rating systems, and other social media tools. Drupal is also an application framework that can be used to build other aps. Drupal requires no programming skills yet the HTML code produced is accessible, cross browser compatible, and search engine friendly. Drupal is used for every type of site from personal blogs to highly trafficked enterprise level sites. 2% of all websites worldwide are built in Drupal including whitehouse.gov and many other high profile, highly visited sites.

What is Drupal Used for?

Drupal is a great choice for building all manner of websites from simple 1 page personal websites to enterprise level applications. It is particularly well suited to e-Learning systems, Community/social networking sites, and news publishing, where its powerful authoring and publishing features allow administrators to create, revise, and deploy content in a rapid and organized manner. User management, site reporting and statistics, ad management, community management, and other administrative functions utilize an intuitive and robust back-end user interface.

Are you looking for Cheap Drupal 8.8.2 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap Drupal 8.8.2 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your Drupal 8.8.2 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap Drupal 8.8.2 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap Drupal 8.8.2 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable Drupal 8.8.2 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

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How to Choose Cheap Drupal 8.8.2 Hosting Provider Recommendation?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap Drupal 8.0.5 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 5.3.2 Hosting

With its yet another release, WordPress has made available the version 5.3.2 available that is focused mainly on fixing bugs and adding enhancements. This is a short-cycle maintenance release that has been made just after WordPress 5.3.1 roll out.

With its long tradition of rolling out maintenance releases one after another, WordPress has remained particularly in addressing major issues that developers face. Maintaining the same, WordPress 5.3.2 release also offers a solution to the issues illustrated below.

  • Date time component issues (major issue found in modified post handling) have been fixed. The get_feed_build_date() function now correctly handles the a modified object with an invalid date.
  • Another priority issue was upload issue (a conflict that was occuring in naming the file) and fix in wp_unique_filename() function so that file name collision can be avoided when uploading a file with upper-case extension on non-case-sensitive file system.
  • Another issue that has been fixed is about wp_unique_filename() which was a concern that was showing PHP warnings while a destination directory for an uploaded file is unreadable.
  • Next comes the release to fix non-default admin color schemes related to background, button,text etc.,the colors in all color schemes for buttons with the .active class has now been fixed.
  • Next update deals with Posts, Post Types that state to use a proper delta comparison when checking the post date to set future or publish status in wp_insert_post()

All these 5 fixes and enhancements will be merged with the next significant WordPress release, i.e., version 5.4, which is currently a priority work for WordPress team.

Another matter of discussion with this latest release is that WordPress has not addressed any security fixes, which means that the platform is majorly focusing to built its core system in terms of security.

Users having automatic update settings do not need to download the same as the version will automatically be installed on their systems.

Take a look at the list of files revised:
  • wp-admin/about.php
  • wp-admin/css/colors/_admin.scss
  • wp-includes/version.php
  • wp-includes/feed.php
  • wp-includes/functions.php
  • wp-includes/post.php
  • wp-includes/version.php
  • That’s all about the latest WordPress 5.3.2 maintenance release!

Accessibility Improvements

“Coffee” color scheme with new button colors.

Some of the biggest accessibility changes fixed issues with the alternate admin color schemes available in WordPress. The accessibility improvements to buttons in WordPress 5.3 did not get carried over to most of the alternate schemes. Or, rather, those alternate color schemes were not taken into account when the changes went into effect. This left secondary button elements practically unreadable in some cases, which made accessibility worse.

Version 5.3.2 creates a unified design for secondary buttons for every color scheme. It also makes sure that the :active state for buttons are consistent.

Other improvements to accessibility include adding underlines to links on the Dashboard screen that were not clearly links by context, properly disabling nav menu forms when they should not be in use, and adding hover effects for links on the “About” admin screens.

Twenty Twenty Changes

Screenshot of the author bio option in the Twenty Twenty theme.
Author bio option in the customizer.

The Twenty Twenty theme launched with JavaScript-based, smooth-scroll behavior for anchor links. This feature did not work correctly in all cases. It also broke anchor links to individual comments when paginated comments were enabled on a site.

Version 1.1 of Twenty Twenty includes CSS-based, smooth-scroll behavior. This greatly simplifies the code by using native behavior. It also works based on the user’s reduced motion setting for their browser, which enhances accessibility for the theme.

The theme update comes packaged with a new option for showing or hiding the post author bio. The setting is available under the “Theme Options” section in the customizer. It is enabled by default and will show the author bio section at the end of every post across the site.

The Twenty Twenty update also includes several bug fixes, most of which were trivial issues.

Are you looking for Cheap WordPress 5.3.2 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap WordPress 5.3.2 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your WordPress 5.3.2 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap WordPress 5.3.2 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap WordPress 5.3.2 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable WordPress 5.3.2 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

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Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
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SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
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How to Choose Cheap and Reliable WordPress 5.3.2 Hosting?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap Crystal Reports 2013 Hosting Recommendation

Is Joomla Beginner Friendly?

When taking one’s first tentative steps into the world of CMSs, there’s a commonly-held belief that WordPress is the best option; it’s simple design philosophy and blog-building origins make it the clear solution for someone trying to get to grips with what is a vast, complex area of modern tech. But is that belief an absolute truth? I’m not so sure, and in my experience Joomla! can be just as viable for the right kind of beginner.

What makes a beginner a beginner?

I know this might seem like a redundant question; a beginner is somebody who knows little to nothing about the subject matter and is starting their journey into the world of web development. While that’s true, we must also consider where a beginner is coming from; that is, what type of beginner are they? Everybody that makes the jump to WordPress, Joomla or any other CMS is doing so for a reason, and what that reason is can have quite a major influence in what CMS would be the best option. At its most basic, there’s two core reasons for someone to start looking at a WordPress or Joomla solution:

  • They’ve got a clear idea for a website, and they want a way to create it quickly and easily, with a focus on content.
  • They’ve got a general idea for a website, but they’re interested in developing their web-development knowledge while building it.

Of course there’s a lot of other factors that might influence one’s decision, but the core motivations generally fall into those two categories. For example, a beginner of the first type might want to start their own online ecommerce store; their primary focus is on the acquisition and distribution of their products, and the website is simply another tool to that end. So, rather than wasting time trying to gain in-depth knowledge of web-development when marketing will be their priority, they can just grab WordPress, a template like our recent Box ecommerce theme that provides the aesthetics, and a plugin like WooCommerce to handle the sales end of things, and they’ve got a good-looking, fully-functional site pretty much out of the box.

The second type of beginner may also have a desire to create a particular type of website, but their primary interest is in learning the skills needed to tailor whatever website they go on to make exactly to their needs. Alternatively, they might be running a basic site already, but have a grand vision of the direction they want it to move in. In their case a ready-made solution isn’t as necessary; the journey is just as important as the final product. As you might have guessed, the second type of beginner is the one we’ll be focusing on in this article.

Making the case for Joomla

Let’s get something out of the way here; though I believe that Joomla! is the better option for the second type of beginner, that does not mean that WordPress isn’t viable if you want to learn about web development. In fact, I would place myself somewhere between beginner and intermediate in terms of knowledge, and I got started with WordPress before Joomla. But as time has gone on I’ve found that while WordPress has the advantage in intuitiveness in regards to creating content, Joomla! has been a much better tool when it came to deepening my knowledge, such as gaining some rudimentary understanding of CSS and HTML and how they interact. If you’re starting out and find yourself gravitating towards WordPress, by all means go for it; you’re still going to be able to learn everything in time, and there’s a huge amount of info in the WordPress codex to help you along. With that said, let’s take a look at why I recommend Joomla.

The frame’s the thing

There’s something to be said for intuitive, user-friendly UI design, and it’s hard to argue that the Joomla! interface surpasses the comfortable layout on offer with WordPress. But still, I’m going to try! The thing is, I’ve always found the WordPress layout to be great as long as you want to create content. Things like posts, pages and menus have their own sections clearly labelled on the sidebar, so getting around is fast and easy. Joomla’s layout is…not so intuitive. At least at first. Buuuuuuut…

The Joomla! backend layout is more logical than it first appears. Sure, the menu options are not as clearly defined and there’s a lot of additional stuff to wade through, but, crucially for those who are interested in how it works, it separates its individual parts into entire subsections. Let me show you what I mean; If I install a plugin into WordPress, what happens? Where does it go? Depending on the scope and function of the plugin, I might find an additional section added to the sidebar, or a new widget added to the widget screen, or sometimes just a few new options added to the ‘Settings’ section. The functionality of the plugin is easy to access, but it doesn’t provide any insight into how it achieves it.

Why is this important? One of the big stumbling blocks with expanding one’s knowledge beyond the basics is finding a solid foothold to build from. We start by learning basic functions, then later, as our experience grows, we come to understand those functions’ place in the wider CMS ecosystem. Joomla’s backend is initially more confusing because it splits its various elements into subsections; one for extensions, one for content, one for components etc…plus many sections, such as modules, are switchable between frontend and backend sections. However, once a user is ready to progress beyond the basics this distinct categorization allows for a more fundamental understanding of the separate parts of the CMS, and how they fit together to form a whole.

Without that guide, the experience gain required to jump from beginner to intermediate (in terms of development, rather than content creation) in WordPress can be more daunting, and requires more self-motivation to find the information required.

First steps with CSS

Once a user decides to start making their own changes beyond the content, the first thing they’ll probably look to mess around with is CSS. There’s a ton of different options available for making changes, but for a beginner just testing the waters and seeing what’s possible a good starting point is the built-in CSS editor that both Joomla! and WordPress offer:

editing css in the wordpress file editor

There are plugins and FTP options available of course, and if you’re on a localhost you can just edit files without any hassle, but when getting to grips with something new I’m much more in favor of taking baby steps; edit CSS in the built in editor first, and worry about things like understanding FTP later, when it’s relevant. There’s virtually no difference in the functionality of the WordPress and Joomla!; both allow for the editing of files directly in the backend, but there’s an important difference that I feel gives Joomla! the edge:

modifying template files in the joomla file editor

Remember the point about structure? In the WordPress version of the editor the list of files that can be changed are on the right sidebar, with the location of each file listed underneath. In Joomla!, the editor instead displays the file structure of the template on the left sidebar. It’s more intuitive for one, and more importantly being able to see the folder and file structure as you select files to view and edit helps to form a template map in your mind; knowing what file contains the information is one thing, but knowing where that file is stored in the overall structure reinforces the frame concept discussed in the last section.

Making changes made easy

To finish, I’d like to bring up what, for me, was the biggest boon in trying to understand how CSS works. Sure, being able to edit files in the admin area of my CMS was helpful, and distinct subsections aided my understanding of the differences between modules, extensions and components, but the biggest tool for learning in any beginner’s arsenal is the ability to experiment.

One of the challenges for WordPress is that it is extremely popular, especially with people who want to run a simple blog or other basic site. It’s the go-to solution for people who aren’t tech-savvy, or those that don’t really need to learn (who needs to learn about CSS, JavaScript and HTML when you’re just posting random thoughts a few times a month?). It’s popularity means it boasts a huge number of people willing to contribute in some way; look at the sheer number of themes and plugins out in the world, both free and paid for, for example.

When a product boasts a user base as large as WordPress’, there inevitably comes a need to ensure the layout and functionality fit to a wide audience. That means that every layout decision must bear in mind that there’s a higher chance of people who know little about web-development using the product. That’s not a knock against WordPress or their users, it’s simply a fact; more popularity means more laymen. For this reason the contributors must be very wary of implementing major backend features that could cause confusion in an inexperienced user base.

Joomla! doesn’t suffer from this issue quite as heavily; there are still plenty of new, inexperienced users jumping in, but the overall impression many people get from Joomla! is that it is for more intermediate users, with greater flexibility than WordPress when going big.

Where this comes into play is with widgets. In WordPress, widgets can be used for a variety of functions, but what you can do with them out of the box is limited. Any widget you add to a position will appear on all pages, requiring an addition such as our Widget Rules plugin that we include with our themes to provide the function. In Joomla!, its use of menu assignments allows greater flexibility for placing modules around the site and controlling when they appear.

Then comes the feature that really made it for me; Module Class Suffixes.

assigning class suffixes to modules for easy css targeting

CSS is hard. I’m sure there’s quite a few of you reading this just bursting with knowledge who’ll argue that CSS is a breeze, but that’s your experience talking; trust me, from someone without much knowledge, it’s hard. It’s hard to get to grips with, once you’ve learned a few tricks it’s still hard to get it to do what you want without a lot of trial and error, and that’s all assuming that you’re even able to target the right element in the first place.

Oh yeah, targeting is REALLY hard. In a complex site they’ll be containers within containers, classes, irregular HTML tags and all sorts of things that confuse things for a newbie who just wants to play around a bit. Module class suffixes take care of all that, especially with our templates.

Consider this; most of our Joomla! templates are built on modules. There’s the Gavern Framework running things under the hood, but the frontpage content and the like is usually built with modules. With module class suffixes, I can take a blank module, slap it into the frontpage using one of the many module positions, and then add a module class suffix that allows me to target this section specifically with CSS, allowing for easy testing of different commands and settings without worrying about nesting or struggling to find a pre-existing bit of code in one of the template files.

With this method, a beginner can get to the fun part of experimenting with CSS without the hassle of learning all about CSS targeting beyond the basics, and can see the results of their CSS on a fully-designed frontpage. Think how much difference an easily-understood challenge can make; if a user is editing CSS on a basic, empty site, then there’s little they can do except try to apply their imagination to it, which isn’t easy if you aren’t clued up on what functions CSS includes. With a module-based frontpage, users can instead insert their own content into the frontpage, give it a suffix to make it easy to target, then try to blend the new addition into the existing style. It’s like the difference between playing Pac-Man with one ghost vs. Pac-Man with four ghosts; one is barely a challenge, whereas the other offers a clear barrier to conquer and the tools to do it.

Rounding Up

Look, I’m not saying that Joomla is better than WordPress; I’ve used them both relatively regularly and can say that, ultimately, you’ll be fine no matter what CMS you go with. The Joomla! features I discussed here are possible to add to WordPress via the use of plugins, but if you’re going in barebones, then Joomla! is, to my eyes, a good choice. So if you’re really into the idea of developing your CSS skills and knowledge rather than getting a website up as soon as possible, then I implore you to give Joomla! a chance!

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Why is Magento The Best for Ecommerce Sites? Magento 2.3.4 Hosting Recommendation

Why is Magento The Best for Ecommerce Sites? Magento 2.3.4 Hosting Recommendation. In this article, we will discuss why is Magento the best for e-commerce sites and who is Magento 2.3.4 hosting recommendation.

Why is Magento The Best for Ecommerce Sites?

One company’s experience with Magento is likely to be totally different than another’s because Magento is really what you make it. A team of highly skilled designers and web developers can make Magento into the Cadillac (or Maserati) of websites, but a poorly done ‘botched theme-job’ could leave you struggling with a site that looks like rubbish.

To get the most out of Magento you’ll want to engage with a company that is serious about SEO and Conversion Rate Optimization.  To start you’ll want a site that has a place to update content regularly or that integrates with an outside blogging platform for regular content updates. You’ll want that blog to live at YourStore.com/blog and look very similar to the rest of your site however you do it, rather than blog.YourStore.com and looking like a totally different site. This ensures your blog content not only attracts potential customers but facilitates them around the site as seamlessly as possible without giving them a jarring effect.

“Everyone uses it”

Yes, we know that this argument may lead to false conclusions. It well may be that something is agreed on by the majority while it is not necessarily the best option.

But now we are talking about ecommerce and business results.

Magento is the second most popular ecommerce platform: it has a market share of 17%, among the Top 100k sites (Magento CE and Magento Enterprise combined, July 2017).

Professional technological support and huge knowledge base

The IT developers of Magento eCommerce, thanks to the help of volunteers, have been able to create a platform that truly serves the unique needs of users.

The flexibility and openness of the system is basically the result of this philosophy. A couple of years ago Magento was acquired by eBay.

This did not come as a disadvantage: it stayed to be an open source platform, while it also enjoyed the massive amount of expertise of the huge ecommerce company.

Magento Commerce then got independent of eBay, but its extremely strong and loyal developer community, which had evolved well before its acquisition by eBay, is still passionately working on its development.

Huge array of product information

It is no surprise that Magento is so popular: it is the most widely used ecommerce platform (according to 2015 statistics) in the world with a nearly 30% market share. Serving such a big chunk of the market successfully would be impossible without a massive amount of flexibility.

You can define basically any product feature you like.

You can set and manage the attributes without compromise in the admin panel. Basically, you can adjust the entire system to your products.

The discount system is equally flexible. For instance, you can give a discount (e.g. a percentage of the price or free shipping) to a particular shopper if he or she puts two products from the same category into the shopping cart. You can define a whole bunch of combinations, you have loads of opportunities to do whatever you like.

Impressive, responsive design

Needless to say that you can tailor the look of your Magento store according to your expectations. It simply could not be any other way, since a standard template would not add very much to your brand value.

It is not a problem if you are not an expert in web design, for Magento offers thousands of freely customizable templates. Installation, however, is recommended to be performed by a specialist.

Responsive design is even more important. There are many solutions on the market that have “forgotten” to adapt to the most recent market needs. Since 2014, more and more people use the internet on their tablets and smartphones, and an increasing proportion of purchases are done on mobile devices.

An online store can compete in such an environment successfully if it has a responsive layout, which means that it offers an interface to its shoppers, which is easy to handle on all platforms from tablets and smartphones to PCs and netbooks.

Supports SEO

Magento features a range of default options to create an SEO-friendly website. You can generate SEO-friendly URLs and sitemaps (e.g. yourdomainname.com/productname), can define the meta data and so on. Searches within your e-store is also crucial, which is also a major strength of Magento.

Customers make multiple, narrow-down searches, which is good for user experience, but less beneficial for SEO because this makes the system generate new product lists or new pages after the searches have been made, but can be regarded as duplicate content by Google.

This drawback can be handled by custom development. The developers of Magento have always kept in mind that Magento websites should be easily found and stay strong in terms of SEO.

Magento is secure

Safety is not an option, it is a must in an environment where hackers try to crack databases every minute. We hear news almost every day mentioning data breaches, so in case of an ecommerce store it is essential to have a hack-proof system.

Luckily, Magento is always tested by a vast number of developers.

The whole system is constantly watched by experts (e.g. ethical hackers) searching for defects and eliminating vulnerability by uploading patches.

But don’t worry, you don’t have to hunt down updates all the time. Magento always calls your attention when an update is available so you will know about fresh developments right away. (You had better ask an expert to carry out the update process, especially when you already have some custom developments in your store.)

All in all, the system is not perfect. No system is. But with Magento it is just amazing how fast its dedicated community can reveal the errors and after making the safety updates, you can avoid any future problems before they can kick in.

Data!

Even if you only have a little experience in online marketing, you very likely know that this business is based on data.

No matter what kind of a website you run, if you want to earn money with it, you need to build databases and after examining them, draw the appropriate conclusions.

You have to know how many visitors you have, how they find you, how much time they spend on your pages etc.

There are a lot of factors you should keep an eye on so that you can optimize your website according to user behaviour and preferences.

You can integrate one of the most useful data collection systems, Google Universal Analytics, into your Magento website.

An even better solution can be implementing Enhanced Ecommerce, specially developed for ecommerce systems. Applying this extension for Analytics needs some programming, but it provides much more detailed data.

Thus you can collect a huge amount of useful data about your shoppers, such as what they like or how they behave when browsing in your store. You also have to watch and control the system. You should know how your website performs, how it works, what may cause failures.

Thanks to the tools of Magento support, you will receive comprehensive reports from which experts can easily find the reasons for malfunctioning.

If you have the possibility, it is worth to request an automated testing system service from your developer partner, which may raise problem solving to a whole new level.

Complete ecommerce toolkit

  • Shopping Cart: Magento can comfortably lead the customers through the whole shopping process. It can be either used by registered users or guests and can also offer multiple payment options.
  • User Account: Shoppers can quickly access their purchase history, check their orders or save products that they want to buy later. In addition, they can store information so that next time they can check out faster. Such information can be delivery address or invoicing address which the users can switch with only one click if they wish to.
  • Management: You can manage transactions in the admin panel, start and complete the shipping process or resolve complaints. A top list can be downloaded about the most searched products (exact terms of what your customers typed in the search field), about the most popular products, or you can see if a particular shopper put some items in his or her shopping cart, but did not order them.
  • Product Management: You can import and export thousands of products and modify their attributes at the same time, you can upload images, set custom pricing conditions, and determine what to show and how to show them in your “shop window”.
  • Marketing: You can run promotions, create unique sales deals, offer free shipping or other special bargains. You also have opportunities for up-selling and cross-selling, you can preset opinions about or comparisons between products, display lists of recently viewed items, and also make it possible for shoppers to share your product pages easily and quickly with each other on social networking sites.
  • Multiple websites: Magento is capable of handling more, an almost unlimited number (!) of websites simultaneously. You can run multiple iterations at the same time with only one user account so managing all these is much simpler. What does it mean more precisely? Say, you have a central online store with a dozen brands. You also have separate e-stores for each brand, all independent from the main website, where you can define different prices and discount offers―and you can manage all this in one single admin area.

Better than anyone – you know what the needs you have for your eCommerce store are – it would be wise to get a master list of these and determine which eCommerce platform lives up to your list before going to a web development shop. If you try to work with a web development company too early, you might find yourself being advised towards a particular solution that doesn’t actually fulfill everything your company needs, because it is what that web development shop is best at.

No web development shop can be the experts in every Content Management System – and it’s actually best if you find a company that is actually specialized in the particular CMS you have a need for. So to recap – these 3 key steps should be taken before you choose an agency:

  • Write out a list of needs of your eCommerce platform to facilitate your online sales goals – both absolutely needs and non-negotiables.
  • Do research on which CMS’s are the best possible solution for your specific needs and which would be most effective as accomplishing the job for the money.
  • Search out and find agencies that have clear examples of using this technology in their portfolio – and contact the top 3-5 to start conversations. Narrow them down as soon as you are able and create a serious discussion where you can determine if you can get what you need done for you budget and if the companies can work together from a ‘cultural-fit’ perspective.

What’s New in Magento 2.3.4?

Highlights

Look for the following highlights in this release:

Substantial security enhancements

This release includes the following security enhancements:

Over 30 security enhancements that help close cross-site scripting (XSS) and remote code execution (RCE) vulnerabilities

No confirmed attacks related to these issues have occurred to date. However, certain vulnerabilities can potentially be exploited to access customer information or take over administrator sessions. Most of these issues require that an attacker first obtains access to the Admin. As a result, we remind you to take all necessary steps to protect your Admin, including but not limited to these efforts: IP whitelisting, two-factor authentication, use of a VPN, the use of a unique location rather than /admin, and good password hygiene. See Adobe Security Bulletin for a discussion of these fixed issues. All known exploitable security issues fixed in this release (2.3.4) have been ported to 2.2.11, 1.14.4.4, and 1.9.4.4, as appropriate.

Security enhancements and fixes to core code

Additional security enhancements include:

  • Removal of custom layout updates and the deprecation of layout updates to remove the opportunity for Remote Code Execution (RCE). The Custom Layout Update field on the CMS Page Edit, Category Edit, and Product Edit pages has now been converted to a selector. You can no longer specify an entity-specific layout update with text but instead must create a physical file that contains the layout updates and select it for use.
  • Redesigned content template features so that only whitelisted variables can be added to templates. This avoids the situation where administrator-defined templates such as email, newsletters, and CMS content can include variables and directives that can directly call PHP functions on objects.

Platform upgrades

The following platform upgrades help enhance website security and PCI compliance.

  • Enhancements to the message queue framework. Magento now supports the latest release of RabbitMQ v3.8, which is the third-party technology that underlies the Magento message queue framework.
  • Improved page caching and session storage. This release has been tested on the latest stable release of Redis v5.0.6.
  • Enhanced support for MariaDB 10.2. Before Magento 2.3.4, when using declarative schema with MariaDB 10.2, Magento threw an error indicating that the schema was not up-to-date after running bin/magento setup:upgrade. With this release, we have normalized the values returned by MariaDB, which allows system integrators to use declarative schema with both MySQL and MariaDB.
  • The core integration of the Authorize.net payment method has been deprecated. Please use the official payment integration that is available on Marketplace.

Note: Magento 2.3.4 has not been tested with PHP 7.1. PHP 7.1 reached EOL (End of Life) on December 1, 2019. We recommend updating your deployment to a supported version of PHP.

Performance boosts

Merchants and customers will see performance improvements as a result of these enhancements:

  • Redundant non-cached requests to the server on catalog pages have been eliminated by refactoring the customer section invalidation mechanism and improving banner cache logic.
  • PHTML files have been refactored to better support parsing by the bundling mechanism. Our new bundling mechanism now identifies all dependencies on JavaScript.
  • Added the ability to disable statistic collecting for Reports module by default. A new configuration setting (System Configuration > General > Reports > General Options) allows merchants to completely or partially disable Magento Reports. (Statistics collection for the Reports module is disabled by default. Magento recommends disabling Reports functionality for performance reasons when this capability is not required.)

Infrastructure improvements

This release contains 250 enhancements to core quality, which improve the quality of the Framework and these modules: catalog, sales, PayPal, Elasticsearch, import, and CMS.

Merchant tool enhancements

  • Integration with Adobe Stock image galleries. The new bundled Adobe stock integration extension enables merchants to add high quality media assets to their website content without leaving the Magento Admin. Merchants can use the searchable interface in the Magento Media Gallery to explore, preview, license, and deploy stock images in website content.

Inventory Management

Inventory Management enhancements for this release include:

  • Addressed a known performance issue that caused higher than expected loads on the database server in scenarios involving the shopping cart.
  • Updated the Inventory Reservations CLI command to reduce memory usage when finding and compensating for missing reservations on large catalogs.
  • Resolved multiple quality issues, including those related to credit memos, grouped products, source and stock mass actions.

GraphQL

This release includes improved GraphQL coverage for search, layered navigation, cart functionality. The following mutations/queries are available:

  • Guest carts can now be merged with customer carts. The mergeCarts mutation transfers the contents of a guest cart into the cart of a logged-in customer.
  • A customer can start an order on one device and complete it on another. Use the `customerCart query to obtain the cart ID for a logged-in customer.
  • Layered navigation can use custom filters. The filter attribute of the products query now requires the ProductAttributeFilterInput object. You can specify a pre-defined filter in this object, or define a custom filter. As a result, layered navigation on your website filters on the attributes you need.
  • You can search categories by ID, name, and/or URL key. The [categoryList](/guides/v2.3/graphql/queries/category-list.html) query replaces the deprecatedcategory` query.
  • The ProductInterface supports fixed product taxes (such as WEEE). Use the storeConfig query to determine whether to store supports these taxes.
  • The cart object has been enhanced to include information about promotions and applied discounts at the line and cart levels.

PWA Studio

For information on these enhancements plus other improvements.

dotdigital

  • Live Chat powered by dotdigital enables merchants to increase conversion rates, and keep customers coming back with real-time engagement. All Magento 2.3.x merchants (both Magento Open Source and Magento Commerce) can receive a free live chat agent without the need for a full dotdigital Engagement Cloud license.
  • Engagement Cloud includes a new Chat widget that makes it easy for shoppers to communicate in real time with customers as they shop in your store. Chat can be accessed from the Engagement Cloud section of the Magento configuration, or directly from your Engagement Cloud account.

Google Shopping ads Channel

Google Shopping ads Channel Release Notes describes all changes to this feature for Magento 2.3.x.

Vendor-developed extension enhancements

This release of Magento includes extensions developed by third-party vendors. It includes both quality and UX improvements to these extensions.

Klarna

Klarna Payments has a new Data sharing on load field in the Magento configuration that can be set to share customer data either after the transaction is authorized, or when the Klarna payment method is selected during checkout.

Magento 2.3.4 Hosting Recommendation

Magento is a feature-rich, professional open-source eCommerce solution that offers merchants complete flexibility and control over the look, content, and functionality of their online store. Features includes powerful marketing, merchandising and content management. Magento is designed for scalability and is backed by an extensive support network.

Are you looking for Magento 2.3.4 Hosting Recommendation? Finding a high quality Cheap Magento 2.3.4 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your Magento 2.3.4 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Magento 2.3.4 Hosting Recommendation provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap Magento 2.3.4 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable Magento 2.3.4 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Magento 2.3.4 Hosting Recommendation

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Best Joomla 3.5 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap Git 2.25.0 Hosting Provider Recommendation

Cheap Git 2.25.0 Hosting Recommendation

Best Joomla 3.5 Hosting Recommendation

Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency. Git is easy to learn and has a tiny footprint with lightning fast performance. It outclasses SCM tools like Subversion, CVS, Perforce, and ClearCase with features like cheap local branching, convenient staging areas, and multiple workflows.

Branching and Merging

The Git feature that really makes it stand apart from nearly every other SCM out there is its branching model.

Git allows and encourages you to have multiple local branches that can be entirely independent of each other. The creation, merging, and deletion of those lines of development takes seconds.

This means that you can do things like:

  • Frictionless Context Switching. Create a branch to try out an idea, commit a few times, switch back to where you branched from, apply a patch, switch back to where you are experimenting, and merge it in.
  • Role-Based Codelines. Have a branch that always contains only what goes to production, another that you merge work into for testing, and several smaller ones for day to day work.
  • Feature Based Workflow. Create new branches for each new feature you’re working on so you can seamlessly switch back and forth between them, then delete each branch when that feature gets merged into your main line.
  • Disposable Experimentation. Create a branch to experiment in, realize it’s not going to work, and just delete it – abandoning the work—with nobody else ever seeing it (even if you’ve pushed other branches in the meantime).

Small and Fast

Git is fast. With Git, nearly all operations are performed locally, giving it a huge speed advantage on centralized systems that constantly have to communicate with a server somewhere.

Git was built to work on the Linux kernel, meaning that it has had to effectively handle large repositories from day one. Git is written in C, reducing the overhead of runtimes associated with higher-level languages. Speed and performance has been a primary design goal of the Git from the start.

Benchmarks

Let’s see how common operations stack up against Subversion, a common centralized version control system that is similar to CVS or Perforce. Smaller is faster.

Distributed

One of the nicest features of any Distributed SCM, Git included, is that it’s distributed. This means that instead of doing a “checkout” of the current tip of the source code, you do a “clone” of the entire repository.

Multiple Backups

This means that even if you’re using a centralized workflow, every user essentially has a full backup of the main server. Each of these copies could be pushed up to replace the main server in the event of a crash or corruption. In effect, there is no single point of failure with Git unless there is only a single copy of the repository.

Any Workflow

Because of Git’s distributed nature and superb branching system, an almost endless number of workflows can be implemented with relative ease.

Subversion-Style Workflow

A centralized workflow is very common, especially from people transitioning from a centralized system. Git will not allow you to push if someone has pushed since the last time you fetched, so a centralized model where all developers push to the same server works just fine.

Data Assurance

The data model that Git uses ensures the cryptographic integrity of every bit of your project. Every file and commit is checksummed and retrieved by its checksum when checked back out. It’s impossible to get anything out of Git other than the exact bits you put in.

Staging Area

Unlike the other systems, Git has something called the “staging area” or “index”. This is an intermediate area where commits can be formatted and reviewed before completing the commit.

One thing that sets Git apart from other tools is that it’s possible to quickly stage some of your files and commit them without committing all of the other modified files in your working directory or having to list them on the command line during the commit.

Free and Open Source

Git is released under the GNU General Public License version 2.0, which is an open source license. The Git project chose to use GPLv2 to guarantee your freedom to share and change free software—to make sure the software is free for all its users.

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How to Choose Cheap Git 2.25.0 Hosting Recommendation?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

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How to Start an Online Store With WordPress in 7 Easy Steps

More than a quarter of the web runs on WordPress. There’s good reason for this – WordPress is easy to use and free. Plus, there’s a ton of free information for novice users to get up and running online in a matter of minutes.

If you’re wondering how to start an online store, you need to read this guide. It will walk you through how to create a powerful e-commerce site with the world’s most popular web platform.

1. Use Personal Passion To Fuel Niche Selection

Almost every successful entrepreneur I’ve crossed paths with attests to the fact that passion is the secret ingredient to the high-roller lifestyle they enjoy. And building an online store takes a lot of passion – with years of effort required (in many cases) before you’ll make enough to pay yourself a meaningful salary.

To find a product that overlaps with your personal passion:

  • Analyze your past shopping habits. Why do you purchase the items that you do, and which ones excited you the most?
  • Sample a few different product categories. Is there something in your local department store that lights you up?
  • How do you want to impact people’s lives? Which products can you sell to help impact others in this way?
  • What do you find yourself doing in your free time? How can you monetize these hobbies with your online store?

The more specific your niche, the more you’ll be able to let your passion shine through online and offline.

2. Catchy Domain Name

Your domain name is how your customers find your website. If they hear about you somewhere, will it be easy for them to remember your name? Will it be easy for Google to use your domain to identify what your site sell?

Here’s how I recommend picking a domain name:

  1. Do keyword research. Domains that include these will be helpful for ranking on Google.
  2. Keep your domain short to minimize mistypes by customers.
  3. Secure all domain extensions (.com.net, etc.) to keep copycats at bay.
  4. Avoid words with multiple spellings. For example, “site” and “sight” sound the same over the phone.
  5. Avoid hyphenated domain names. Your customers will forget the hyphen.
  6. Consider alternate meanings or interpretations. Think about goofy, or immature interpretations of your domain name. You don’t want to be the butt of a joke.
  7. Make it easy to say. If a toddler can’t say it, it’s no good.

3. Nail Down Your Business Plan

When learning how to start an online store with WordPress, you need to create a comprehensive business plan for your company that lays out exactly how you envision:

  • selecting products to sell,
  • acquiring inventory,
  • creating your website,
  • marketing your website,
  • growing your market share,
  • remaining compliant with legal requirements,
  • handling taxes and other operating costs.

Even if you don’t need an outside investor to fund your dream, a plan will help you stay on track and focus your efforts. You’ll also find that as you write your business plan, other problems and ideas that hadn’t occurred to you will help focus your efforts in a more productive way.

4. Set up WooCommerce

WordPress creates a powerful foundation for your site. WooCommerce transforms your WordPress site into an e-commerce powerhouse – and the base package is free. Even without paid plugins, you can implement the best elements of e-commerce design on all of your most important pages.

Setting up WooCommerce and listing your first product for sale isn’t complicated:

  1. Select a host for your site that offers a package designed for WordPress (the foundation of WooCommerce). Pay attention to their security and performance metrics – if you can’t find them, it’s time to look at a different host. And don’t forget about customer service – if something goes wrong, you need fast, competent help.
  2. Download and install the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress. Answer the questions in the setup wizard to get your site up and running in less than 5 minutes.
  3. Select, install and customize a WordPress theme that’s fully compatible with WooCommerce.
  4. Use the Product Tab in your WordPress Admin center to add your first product. It will guide you through the process, step-by-step.

5. Selecting a WooCommerce Friendly Theme for WordPress

Your theme decides the entire layout and feel of your site. Finding a great theme that invites browsers to become buyers is worth taking a little extra time.

ShopIsle

ShopIsle is a powerful WordPress theme because it is clean and clearly features products in a way that scores engagements. A grid of large pictures, with core information below, encourages customers to quickly browse and click on what interests them.

And, it’s fully compatible with WooCommerce, right out of the box. The responsive design is fully compatible with screens of all sizes – letting your customers shop how and where they feel most comfortable.

Storefront

Storefront is the official WooCommerce theme. It’s optimized to work with the platform out the box and provides you with some nice presentation and design choices. Storefront itself is free, but there are also loads of other paid add-ons and customizations.

Perhaps the only downside with this one is that of originality – when using it, you’re making your store look like many other e-commerce stores running the same theme.

Congratulations, at this stage you’ve selected a host, installed WordPress and the WooCommerce plugin. Now it’s time to really unlock the potential of your store with some additional plugins. Here are the ones I always use:

Yoast SEO

Yoast SEO helps me to understand whether the content on my WordPress site is easy to read – for both humans and search engines.

It tells me this with a simple red, orange or green dot in my “Posts” page.

I can also set specific parameters for how my content shows up in search results – with quick edits to the slug, meta description and content title. This is powerful for keyword purposes. Oh, and for the content within a post, the tool grades my writing and provides specific recommendations at the bottom of the page.

OptinMonster

OptinMonster is like a steroid shot in the arm of your email marketing campaign. As visitors browse your site, you can prompt them to sign-up for your newsletter. This gives you their contact information, and an opportunity to build a relationship with them.

Some sites report anywhere from a 600% to 1613% growth in new subscriber acquisition rates by using this tool.

If you have the ability to directly communicate with a target customer, on-demand, without having to pay for a PPC or retargeting campaign, you’ve got a serious opportunity to score future sales.

Freshdesk

As you build up your customer base, it’s important that you provide them with amazing online customer service.

Freshdesk allows you to create searchable knowledge bases where customers can help themselves. And, if they need to reach you, Freshdesk’s ticketing system helps you keep customer requests organized, and helps your customer feel like their questions are being attended to.

The annual cost for Freshdesk ranges from $79 to $199, depending on your needs.

6. Attract With Content and SEO

“If you build it, they will come.” Field of Dreams was an excellent movie, but if they were talking about e-commerce, they would have changed the catch-phrase to: “If you write a lot, in an SEO-friendly way, they will come.”

You need search engines to send motivated customers, ready to make a buying decision to your online store. The way that you do this is with content – lots of content.

7. Grow Traffic with Facebook Ads

When you are shopping for a product or service, who do you trust? Chances are, you’ll ask a few of your friends what they own, and whether or not they love their products. Social selling is a way to cash-in on a shopper’s instinct to trust their friends and family.

Advertising your brand’s Facebook Page, or promoting a Facebook ad for a particular page of your website is an excellent way to inject your brand into your customer’s newsfeed.

For example, this Facebook event listing has been promoted by a website attempting to sell tickets to a show. The ad, which appeared at the top of my newsfeed, tells me that one of my friends is already interested in the show, and is probably going to go.

Instantly, this brand and entertainment product has more relevance, and I can trust that it’s probably a cool way to spend an evening.

Create targeted Facebook ads to engage the ideal customers for your products. And, as you post on your blog, you can share links with catchy Facebook posts to help drive traffic. Just make sure your list is targeted.

You can start your own online store using WordPress and WooCommerce, it’s easy!

I hope you enjoyed my post, and feel confident that launching your own e-commerce store isn’t rocket science. It takes a lot of time and trial and error, but if you follow the steps I outlined, you’ll be up and running in no time!

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