Home

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 4.5 Hosting

Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 4.5 Hosting

MediaWiki is free server-based software which is licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL). It’s designed to be run on a large server farm for a website that gets millions of hits per day.

A Wiki is a web application that allows users to create and edit web page content using a web browser. The term wiki also refers to the collaborative software used to create such a website. Mediawiki is a wiki software package licensed under the GNU General Public License, making it free and open source software. This Mediawiki software is used to run the popular web encyclopaedia Wikipedia, besides all projects of Wikimedia, wikis hosted by Wikia, and many other wikis.

What is MediaWiki Used for?

Collaborative wiki software has revamped how we as Internet users approach content on the Internet. Whereas previous content was bundled into either static information added by a webmaster or a discussion board-like format, wikis allow any user to contribute their knowledge to the entirety of the Internet.

Here on campus, Kennesaw State University uses Mediawiki, which is the web software behind Wikipedia. When thinking about a particular project and the role a wiki can have in it, please consider that wikis can be beneficial in some areas and detrimental in others.

Beneficial areas for wikis include:

  • Course-collaborative data or research – Wikis allow for grouping and organization of data into categories and topics and allow each page to be editable by any of the permissable users.
  • Department-specific tasks or guidelines – Guidelines or tasks allow for guidelines to be always up-to-date, being updatable by any employee who accesses the page.
  • Project Details – Wikis provide a central area for users to update information, meeting details, tasks, and knowledge regarding departmental projects.

Detrimental areas for wikis include:

  • Message boards – Message boards do not naturally fit in a wiki system, as any message or shared item can be edited or removed by another user.
  • Sharing portals – As with message boards, shared items can be edited by any user after posting.
  • Public facing site – As all wikis hosted on campus are authenticated through netID, the wiki pages are not readable by non-authenticated users.
  • File hosting – Wikis are not acceptable sites for hosting files such as video, images, and documents.

Are You Looking for Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting?

Finding a high quality Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your MediaWiki 1.35.0 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting Recommendation

 

logo-asphostportal1
discountservice-icon
logo-ukwindowshostaspnet
ASPHostPortal DiscountService.biz UKWindowsHostASP.NET
$1.00/month $2.00/month £3.00/month
Host 1 Site Host 1 Site Host 5 Sites
1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space
10 GB Bandwidth 10 GB Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap MediaWiki 1.35.0 Hosting Recommendation?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Best Joomla 3.5 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting Provider Recommendation

Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting Recommendation

Best Joomla 3.5 Hosting Recommendation

Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency. Git is easy to learn and has a tiny footprint with lightning fast performance. It outclasses SCM tools like Subversion, CVS, Perforce, and ClearCase with features like cheap local branching, convenient staging areas, and multiple workflows.

What’s New on Git 2.29.0?

Git 2.29 Release Notes
======================

Updates since v2.28
-------------------

UI, Workflows & Features

 * "git help log" has been enhanced by sharing more material from the
   documentation for the underlying "git rev-list" command.

 * "git for-each-ref --format=<>" learned %(contents:size).

 * "git merge" learned to selectively omit " into <branch>" at the end
   of the title of default merge message with merge.suppressDest
   configuration.

 * The component to respond to "git fetch" request is made more
   configurable to selectively allow or reject object filtering
   specification used for partial cloning.

 * Stop when "sendmail.*" configuration variables are defined, which
   could be a mistaken attempt to define "sendemail.*" variables.

 * The existing backends for "git mergetool" based on variants of vim
   have been refactored and then support for "nvim" has been added.

 * "git bisect" learns the "--first-parent" option to find the first
   breakage along the first-parent chain.

 * "git log --first-parent -p" showed patches only for single-parent
   commits on the first-parent chain; the "--first-parent" option has
   been made to imply "-m".  Use "--no-diff-merges" to restore the
   previous behaviour to omit patches for merge commits.

 * The commit labels used to explain each side of conflicted hunks
   placed by the sequencer machinery have been made more readable by
   humans.

 * The "--batch-size" option of "git multi-pack-index repack" command
   is now used to specify that very small packfiles are collected into
   one until the total size roughly exceeds it.

 * The recent addition of SHA-256 support is marked as experimental in
   the documentation.

 * "git fetch" learned --no-write-fetch-head option to avoid writing
   the FETCH_HEAD file.

 * Command line completion (in contrib/) usually omits redundant,
   deprecated and/or dangerous options from its output; it learned to
   optionally include all of them.

 * The output from the "diff" family of the commands had abbreviated
   object names of blobs involved in the patch, but its length was not
   affected by the --abbrev option.  Now it is.

 * "git worktree" gained a "repair" subcommand to help users recover
   after moving the worktrees or repository manually without telling
   Git.  Also, "git init --separate-git-dir" no longer corrupts
   administrative data related to linked worktrees.

 * The "--format=" option to the "for-each-ref" command and friends
   learned a few more tricks, e.g. the ":short" suffix that applies to
   "objectname" now also can be used for "parent", "tree", etc.

 * "git worktree add" learns that the "-d" is a synonym to "--detach"
   option to create a new worktree without being on a branch.

 * "format-patch --range-diff=<prev> <origin>..HEAD" has been taught
   not to ignore <origin> when <prev> is a single version.

 * "add -p" now allows editing paths that were only added in intent.

 * The 'meld' backend of the "git mergetool" learned to give the
   underlying 'meld' the '--auto-merge' option, which would help
   reduce the amount of text that requires manual merging.

 * "git for-each-ref" and friends that list refs used to allow only
   one --merged or --no-merged to filter them; they learned to take
   combination of both kind of filtering.

 * "git maintenance", a "git gc"'s big brother, has been introduced to
   take care of more repository maintenance tasks, not limited to the
   object database cleaning.

 * "git receive-pack" that accepts requests by "git push" learned to
   outsource most of the ref updates to the new "proc-receive" hook.

 * "git push" that wants to be atomic and wants to send push
   certificate learned not to prepare and sign the push certificate
   when it fails the local check (hence due to atomicity it is known
   that no certificate is needed).

 * "git commit-graph write" learned to limit the number of bloom
   filters that are computed from scratch with the --max-new-filters
   option.

 * The transport protocol v2 has become the default again.

 * The installation procedure learned to optionally omit "git-foo"
   executable files for each 'foo' built-in subcommand, which are only
   required by old timers that still rely on the age old promise that
   prepending "git --exec-path" output to PATH early in their script
   will keep the "git-foo" calls they wrote working.

 * The command line completion (in contrib/) learned that "git restore
   -s <TAB>" is often followed by a refname.

 * "git shortlog" has been taught to group commits by the contents of
   the trailer lines, like "Reviewed-by:", "Coauthored-by:", etc.

 * "git archive" learns the "--add-file" option to include untracked
   files into a snapshot from a tree-ish.

 * "git fetch" and "git push" support negative refspecs.

 * "git format-patch" learns to take "whenAble" as a possible value
   for the format.useAutoBase configuration variable to become no-op
   when the  automatically computed base does not make sense.

 * Credential helpers are now allowed to terminate lines with CRLF
   line ending, as well as LF line ending.


Performance, Internal Implementation, Development Support etc.

 * The changed-path Bloom filter is improved using ideas from an
   independent implementation.

 * Updates to the changed-paths bloom filter.

 * The test framework has been updated so that most tests will run
   with predictable (artificial) timestamps.

 * Preliminary clean-up of the refs API in preparation for adding a
   new refs backend "reftable".

 * Dev support to limit the use of test_must_fail to only git commands.

 * While packing many objects in a repository with a promissor remote,
   lazily fetching missing objects from the promissor remote one by
   one may be inefficient---the code now attempts to fetch all the
   missing objects in batch (obviously this won't work for a lazy
   clone that lazily fetches tree objects as you cannot even enumerate
   what blobs are missing until you learn which trees are missing).

 * The pretend-object mechanism checks if the given object already
   exists in the object store before deciding to keep the data
   in-core, but the check would have triggered lazy fetching of such
   an object from a promissor remote.

 * The argv_array API is useful for not just managing argv but any
   "vector" (NULL-terminated array) of strings, and has seen adoption
   to a certain degree.  It has been renamed to "strvec" to reduce the
   barrier to adoption.

 * The final leg of SHA-256 transition plus doc updates.  Note that
   there is no interoperability between SHA-1 and SHA-256
   repositories yet.

 * CMake support to build with MSVC for Windows bypassing the Makefile.

 * A new helper function has_object() has been introduced to make it
   easier to mark object existence checks that do and don't want to
   trigger lazy fetches, and a few such checks are converted using it.

 * A no-op replacement function implemented as a C preprocessor macro
   does not perform as good a job as one implemented as a "static
   inline" function in catching errors in parameters; replace the
   former with the latter in <git-compat-util.h> header.

 * Test framework update.
   (merge d572f52a64 es/test-cmp-typocatcher later to maint).

 * Updates to "git merge" tests, in preparation for a new merge
   strategy backend.

 * midx and commit-graph files now use the byte defined in their file
   format specification for identifying the hash function used for
   object names.

 * The FETCH_HEAD is now always read from the filesystem regardless of
   the ref backend in use, as its format is much richer than the
   normal refs, and written directly by "git fetch" as a plain file..

 * An unused binary has been discarded, and and a bunch of commands
   have been turned into into built-in.

 * A handful of places in in-tree code still relied on being able to
   execute the git subcommands, especially built-ins, in "git-foo"
   form, which have been corrected.

 * When a packfile is removed by "git repack", multi-pack-index gets
   cleared; the code was taught to do so less aggressively by first
   checking if the midx actually refers to a pack that no longer
   exists.

 * Internal API clean-up to handle two options "diff-index" and "log"
   have, which happen to share the same short form, more sensibly.

 * The "add -i/-p" machinery has been written in C but it is not used
   by default yet.  It is made default to those who are participating
   in feature.experimental experiment.

 * Allow maintainers to tweak $(TAR) invocations done while making
   distribution tarballs.

 * "git index-pack" learned to resolve deltified objects with greater
   parallelism.

 * "diff-highlight" (in contrib/) had a logic to flush its output upon
   seeing a blank line but the way it detected a blank line was broken.

 * The logic to skip testing on the tagged commit and the tag itself
   was not quite consistent which led to failure of Windows test
   tasks.  It has been revamped to consistently skip revisions that
   have already been tested, based on the tree object of the revision.


Fixes since v2.28
-----------------

 * The "mediawiki" remote backend which lives in contrib/mw-to-git/
   and is not built with git by default, had an RCE bug allowing a
   malicious MediaWiki server operator to inject arbitrary commands
   for execution by a cloning client. This has been fixed.

   The bug was discovered and reported by Joern Schneeweisz of GitLab
   to the git-security mailing list. Its practical impact due to the
   obscurity of git-remote-mediawiki was deemed small enough to forgo
   a dedicated security release.

 * "git clone --separate-git-dir=$elsewhere" used to stomp on the
   contents of the existing directory $elsewhere, which has been
   taught to fail when $elsewhere is not an empty directory.
   (merge dfaa209a79 bw/fail-cloning-into-non-empty later to maint).

 * With the base fix to 2.27 regresion, any new extensions in a v0
   repository would still be silently honored, which is not quite
   right.  Instead, complain and die loudly.
   (merge ec91ffca04 jk/reject-newer-extensions-in-v0 later to maint).

 * Fetching from a lazily cloned repository resulted at the server
   side in attempts to lazy fetch objects that the client side has,
   many of which will not be available from the third-party anyway.
   (merge 77aa0941ce jt/avoid-lazy-fetching-upon-have-check later to maint).

 * Fix to an ancient bug caused by an over-eager attempt for
   optimization.
   (merge a98f7fb366 rs/add-index-entry-optim-fix later to maint).

 * Pushing a ref whose name contains non-ASCII character with the
   "--force-with-lease" option did not work over smart HTTP protocol,
   which has been corrected.
   (merge cd85b447bf bc/push-cas-cquoted-refname later to maint).

 * "git mv src dst", when src is an unmerged path, errored out
   correctly but with an incorrect error message to claim that src is
   not tracked, which has been clarified.
   (merge 9b906af657 ct/mv-unmerged-path-error later to maint).

 * Fix to a regression introduced during 2.27 cycle.
   (merge cada7308ad en/fill-directory-exponential later to maint).

 * Command line completion (in contrib/) update.
   (merge 688b87c81b mp/complete-show-color-moved later to maint).

 * All "mergy" operations that internally use the merge-recursive
   machinery should honor the merge.renormalize configuration, but
   many of them didn't.

 * Doc cleanup around "worktree".
   (merge dc9c144be5 es/worktree-doc-cleanups later to maint).

 * The "git blame --first-parent" option was not documented, but now
   it is.
   (merge 11bc12ae1e rp/blame-first-parent-doc later to maint).

 * The logic to find the ref transaction hook script attempted to
   cache the path to the found hook without realizing that it needed
   to keep a copied value, as the API it used returned a transitory
   buffer space.  This has been corrected.
   (merge 09b2aa30c9 ps/ref-transaction-hook later to maint).

 * Recent versions of "git diff-files" shows a diff between the index
   and the working tree for "intent-to-add" paths as a "new file"
   patch; "git apply --cached" should be able to take "git diff-files"
   and should act as an equivalent to "git add" for the path, but the
   command failed to do so for such a path.
   (merge 4c025c667e rp/apply-cached-with-i-t-a later to maint).

 * "git diff [<tree-ish>] $path" for a $path that is marked with i-t-a
   bit was not showing the mode bits from the working tree.
   (merge cb0dd22b82 rp/ita-diff-modefix later to maint).

 * Ring buffer with size 4 used for bin-hex translation resulted in a
   wrong object name in the sequencer's todo output, which has been
   corrected.
   (merge 5da69c0dac ak/sequencer-fix-find-uniq-abbrev later to maint).

 * When given more than one target line ranges, "git blame -La,b
   -Lc,d" was over-eager to coalesce groups of original lines and
   showed incorrect results, which has been corrected.
   (merge c2ebaa27d6 jk/blame-coalesce-fix later to maint).

 * The regexp to identify the function boundary for FORTRAN programs
   has been updated.
   (merge 75c3b6b2e8 pb/userdiff-fortran-update later to maint).

 * A few end-user facing messages have been updated to be
   hash-algorithm agnostic.
   (merge 4279000d3e jc/object-names-are-not-sha-1 later to maint).

 * "unlink" emulation on MinGW has been optimized.
   (merge 680e0b4524 jh/mingw-unlink later to maint).

 * The purpose of "git init --separate-git-dir" is to initialize a
   new project with the repository separate from the working tree,
   or, in the case of an existing project, to move the repository
   (the .git/ directory) out of the working tree. It does not make
   sense to use --separate-git-dir with a bare repository for which
   there is no working tree, so disallow its use with bare
   repositories.
   (merge ccf236a23a es/init-no-separate-git-dir-in-bare later to maint).

 * "ls-files -o" mishandled the top-level directory of another git
   working tree that hangs in the current git working tree.
   (merge ab282aa548 en/dir-nonbare-embedded later to maint).

 * Fix some incorrect UNLEAK() annotations.
   (merge 3e19816dc0 jk/unleak-fixes later to maint).

 * Use more buffered I/O where we used to call many small write(2)s.
   (merge a698d67b08 rs/more-buffered-io later to maint).

 * The patch-id computation did not ignore the "incomplete last line"
   marker like whitespaces.
   (merge 82a62015a7 rs/patch-id-with-incomplete-line later to maint).

 * Updates into a lazy/partial clone with a submodule did not work
   well with transfer.fsckobjects set.

 * The parser for "git for-each-ref --format=..." was too loose when
   parsing the "%(trailers...)" atom, and forgot that "trailers" and
   "trailers:<modifiers>" are the only two allowed forms, which has
   been corrected.
   (merge 2c22e102f8 hv/ref-filter-trailers-atom-parsing-fix later to maint).

 * Long ago, we decided to use 3 threads by default when running the
   index-pack task in parallel, which has been adjusted a bit upwards.
   (merge fbff95b67f jk/index-pack-w-more-threads later to maint).

 * "git restore/checkout --no-overlay" with wildcarded pathspec
   mistakenly removed matching paths in subdirectories, which has been
   corrected.
   (merge bfda204ade rs/checkout-no-overlay-pathspec-fix later to maint).

 * The description of --cached/--index options in "git apply --help"
   has been updated.
   (merge d064702be3 rp/apply-cached-doc later to maint).

 * Feeding "$ZERO_OID" to "git log --ignore-missing --stdin", and
   running "git log --ignore-missing $ZERO_OID" fell back to start
   digging from HEAD; it has been corrected to become a no-op, like
   "git log --tags=no-tag-matches-this-pattern" does.
   (merge 04a0e98515 jk/rev-input-given-fix later to maint).

 * Various callers of run_command API have been modernized.
   (merge afbdba391e jc/run-command-use-embedded-args later to maint).

 * List of options offered and accepted by "git add -i/-p" were
   inconsistent, which have been corrected.
   (merge ce910287e7 pw/add-p-allowed-options-fix later to maint).

 * "git diff --stat -w" showed 0-line changes for paths whose changes
   were only whitespaces, which was not intuitive.  We now omit such
   paths from the stat output.
   (merge 1cf3d5db9b mr/diff-hide-stat-wo-textual-change later to maint).

 * It was possible for xrealloc() to send a non-NULL pointer that has
   been freed, which has been fixed.
   (merge 6479ea4a8a jk/xrealloc-avoid-use-after-free later to maint).

 * "git status" has trouble showing where it came from by interpreting
   reflog entries that record certain events, e.g. "checkout @{u}", and
   gives a hard/fatal error.  Even though it inherently is impossible
   to give a correct answer because the reflog entries lose some
   information (e.g. "@{u}" does not record what branch the user was
   on hence which branch 'the upstream' needs to be computed, and even
   if the record were available, the relationship between branches may
   have changed), at least hide the error and allow "status" to show its
   output.

 * "git status --short" quoted a path with SP in it when tracked, but
   not those that are untracked, ignored or unmerged.  They are all
   shown quoted consistently.

 * "git diff/show" on a change that involves a submodule used to read
   the information on commits in the submodule from a wrong repository
   and gave a wrong information when the commit-graph is involved.
   (merge 85a1ec2c32 mf/submodule-summary-with-correct-repository later to maint).

 * Unlike "git config --local", "git config --worktree" did not fail
   early and cleanly when started outside a git repository.
   (merge 378fe5fc3d mt/config-fail-nongit-early later to maint).

 * There is a logic to estimate how many objects are in the
   repository, which is meant to run once per process invocation, but
   it ran every time the estimated value was requested.
   (merge 67bb65de5d jk/dont-count-existing-objects-twice later to maint).

 * "git remote set-head" that failed still said something that hints
   the operation went through, which was misleading.
   (merge 5a07c6c3c2 cs/don-t-pretend-a-failed-remote-set-head-succeeded later to maint).

 * "git fetch --all --ipv4/--ipv6" forgot to pass the protocol options
   to instances of the "git fetch" that talk to individual remotes,
   which has been corrected.
   (merge 4e735c1326 ar/fetch-ipversion-in-all later to maint).

 * The "unshelve" subcommand of "git p4" incorrectly used commit^N
   where it meant to say commit~N to name the Nth generation
   ancestor, which has been corrected.
   (merge 0acbf5997f ld/p4-unshelve-fix later to maint).

 * "git clone" that clones from SHA-1 repository, while
   GIT_DEFAULT_HASH set to use SHA-256 already, resulted in an
   unusable repository that half-claims to be SHA-256 repository
   with SHA-1 objects and refs.  This has been corrected.

 * Adjust sample hooks for hash algorithm other than SHA-1.
   (merge d8d3d632f4 dl/zero-oid-in-hooks later to maint).

 * "git range-diff" showed incorrect diffstat, which has been
   corrected.

 * Earlier we taught "git pull" to warn when the user does not say the
   histories need to be merged, rebased or accepts only fast-
   forwarding, but the warning triggered for those who have set the
   pull.ff configuration variable.
   (merge 54200cef86 ah/pull later to maint).

 * Compilation fix around type punning.
   (merge 176380fd11 jk/drop-unaligned-loads later to maint).

 * "git blame --ignore-rev/--ignore-revs-file" failed to validate
   their input are valid revision, and failed to take into account
   that the user may want to give an annotated tag instead of a
   commit, which has been corrected.
   (merge 610e2b9240 jc/blame-ignore-fix later to maint).

 * "git bisect start X Y", when X and Y are not valid committish
   object names, should take X and Y as pathspec, but didn't.
   (merge 73c6de06af cc/bisect-start-fix later to maint).

 * The explanation of the "scissors line" has been clarified.
   (merge 287416dba6 eg/mailinfo-doc-scissors later to maint).

 * A race that leads to an access to a free'd data was corrected in
   the codepath that reads pack files.
   (merge bda959c476 mt/delta-base-cache-races later to maint).

 * in_merge_bases_many(), a way to see if a commit is reachable from
   any commit in a set of commits, was totally broken when the
   commit-graph feature was in use, which has been corrected.
   (merge 8791bf1841 ds/in-merge-bases-many-optim-bug later to maint).

 * "git submodule update --quiet" did not squelch underlying "rebase"
   and "pull" commands.
   (merge 3ad0401e9e td/submodule-update-quiet later to maint).

 * The lazy fetching done internally to make missing objects available
   in a partial clone incorrectly made permanent damage to the partial
   clone filter in the repository, which has been corrected.

 * "log -c --find-object=X" did not work well to find a merge that
   involves a change to an object X from only one parent.
   (merge 957876f17d jk/diff-cc-oidfind-fix later to maint).

 * Other code cleanup, docfix, build fix, etc.
   (merge 84544f2ea3 sk/typofixes later to maint).
   (merge b17f411ab5 ar/help-guides-doc later to maint).
   (merge 98c6871fad rs/grep-simpler-parse-object-or-die-call later to maint).
   (merge 861c4ce141 en/typofixes later to maint).
   (merge 60e47f6773 sg/ci-git-path-fix-with-pyenv later to maint).
   (merge e2bfa50ac3 jb/doc-packfile-name later to maint).
   (merge 918d8ff780 es/worktree-cleanup later to maint).
   (merge dc156bc31f ma/t1450-quotefix later to maint).
   (merge 56e743426b en/merge-recursive-comment-fixes later to maint).
   (merge 7d23ff818f rs/bisect-oid-to-hex-fix later to maint).
   (merge de20baf2c9 ny/notes-doc-sample-update later to maint).
   (merge f649aaaf82 so/rev-parser-errormessage-fix later to maint).
   (merge 6103d58b7f bc/sha-256-cvs-svn-updates later to maint).
   (merge ac900fddb7 ma/stop-progress-null-fix later to maint).
   (merge e767963ab6 rs/upload-pack-sigchain-fix later to maint).
   (merge a831908599 rs/preserve-merges-unused-code-removal later to maint).
   (merge 6dfefe70a9 jb/commit-graph-doc-fix later to maint).
   (merge 847b37271e pb/set-url-docfix later to maint).
   (merge 748f733d54 mt/checkout-entry-dead-code-removal later to maint).
   (merge ce820cbd58 dl/subtree-docs later to maint).
   (merge 55fe225dde jk/leakfix later to maint).
   (merge ee22a29215 so/pretty-abbrev-doc later to maint).
   (merge 3100fd5588 jc/post-checkout-doc later to maint).
   (merge 17bae89476 pb/doc-external-diff-env later to maint).
   (merge 27ed6ccc12 jk/worktree-check-clean-leakfix later to maint).
   (merge 1302badd16 ea/blame-use-oideq later to maint).
   (merge e6d5a11fed al/t3200-back-on-a-branch later to maint).
   (merge 324efcf6b6 pw/add-p-leakfix later to maint).
   (merge 1c6ffb546b jk/add-i-fixes later to maint).
   (merge e40e936551 cd/commit-graph-doc later to maint).
   (merge 0512eabd91 jc/sequencer-stopped-sha-simplify later to maint).
   (merge d01141de5a so/combine-diff-simplify later to maint).
   (merge 3be01e5ab1 sn/fast-import-doc later to maint).

Branching and Merging

The Git feature that really makes it stand apart from nearly every other SCM out there is its branching model.

Git allows and encourages you to have multiple local branches that can be entirely independent of each other. The creation, merging, and deletion of those lines of development takes seconds.

This means that you can do things like:

  • Frictionless Context Switching. Create a branch to try out an idea, commit a few times, switch back to where you branched from, apply a patch, switch back to where you are experimenting, and merge it in.
  • Role-Based Codelines. Have a branch that always contains only what goes to production, another that you merge work into for testing, and several smaller ones for day to day work.
  • Feature Based Workflow. Create new branches for each new feature you’re working on so you can seamlessly switch back and forth between them, then delete each branch when that feature gets merged into your main line.
  • Disposable Experimentation. Create a branch to experiment in, realize it’s not going to work, and just delete it – abandoning the work—with nobody else ever seeing it (even if you’ve pushed other branches in the meantime).

Small and Fast

Git is fast. With Git, nearly all operations are performed locally, giving it a huge speed advantage on centralized systems that constantly have to communicate with a server somewhere.

Git was built to work on the Linux kernel, meaning that it has had to effectively handle large repositories from day one. Git is written in C, reducing the overhead of runtimes associated with higher-level languages. Speed and performance has been a primary design goal of the Git from the start.

Benchmarks

Let’s see how common operations stack up against Subversion, a common centralized version control system that is similar to CVS or Perforce. Smaller is faster.

Distributed

One of the nicest features of any Distributed SCM, Git included, is that it’s distributed. This means that instead of doing a “checkout” of the current tip of the source code, you do a “clone” of the entire repository.

Multiple Backups

This means that even if you’re using a centralized workflow, every user essentially has a full backup of the main server. Each of these copies could be pushed up to replace the main server in the event of a crash or corruption. In effect, there is no single point of failure with Git unless there is only a single copy of the repository.

Any Workflow

Because of Git’s distributed nature and superb branching system, an almost endless number of workflows can be implemented with relative ease.

Subversion-Style Workflow

A centralized workflow is very common, especially from people transitioning from a centralized system. Git will not allow you to push if someone has pushed since the last time you fetched, so a centralized model where all developers push to the same server works just fine.

Data Assurance

The data model that Git uses ensures the cryptographic integrity of every bit of your project. Every file and commit is checksummed and retrieved by its checksum when checked back out. It’s impossible to get anything out of Git other than the exact bits you put in.

Staging Area

Unlike the other systems, Git has something called the “staging area” or “index”. This is an intermediate area where commits can be formatted and reviewed before completing the commit.

One thing that sets Git apart from other tools is that it’s possible to quickly stage some of your files and commit them without committing all of the other modified files in your working directory or having to list them on the command line during the commit.

Free and Open Source

Git is released under the GNU General Public License version 2.0, which is an open source license. The Git project chose to use GPLv2 to guarantee your freedom to share and change free software—to make sure the software is free for all its users.

Are you looking for Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your Git 2.29.0 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable Git 2.29.0 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting Recommendation

 

logo-asphostportal1
discountservice-icon
logo-ukwindowshostaspnet
ASPHostPortal DiscountService.biz UKWindowsHostASP.NET
$1.00/month $2.00/month £3.00/month
Host 1 Site Host 1 Site Host 5 Sites
1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space
10 GB Bandwidth 10 GB Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap Git 2.29.0 Hosting Recommendation?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap Sitefinity 9.0 Hosting Recommendation

How To Change WordPress Password If You Forgot It

If you’re like us, chances are, every so often you will forget a WordPress Administrator password and you’ll need to reset it. Luckily, WordPress has quite a number of ways in which you can change an Administrator (or any other user) password, of course as long as you still have access to the website via your hosting account.

Reset your password via email

WordPress makes it very easy to reset your password if you have access to the original email that you had associated with your account. Simply visit the WordPress login page, and click on the Lost your Password link.

lost your password screenshot

You will then be asked to enter the username or the email address of the user whose password you have forgotten.

Once you do that, you will be sent an email with a link to reset the password. Click on the link and follow the instructions.

Change your WordPress password via PHPMyAdmin

Be Careful: Do not perform any modifications, delete or change any of the WordPress database tables if you do not know what you are doing.  You can potentially corrupt your database, lose information or delete your whole database.

You can change the admin password if you have access to PHPMyAdmin. Browse to PHPMyAdmin using the database administrator and password which you should have available as part of your WordPress web hosting details.

phpmyadmin to access WordPress users table

Now you’ll need to access the Users table in PHPMyAdmin:

On the left, you will see 2 links, click on the name of the database of the WordPress site you want to change the password for. You will see all the table names are prefixed with some letters, e.g. wp_

The table names are on the right of the Underscore.

Scroll down to the table  wp_users. Click on the ‘Browse‘ tab.

You will now see a list of users – you need to find the user which you want to change the password for. Click on the ‘Pencil‘ or Edit to edit the WordPress Administrator user.

The next screen is where you can change your password, find the user_pass field:

    • Change the user_pass dropdown to ‘MD5′
    • Enter in a new password in the text box beside it – you can enter it in plain text, the password will then be encoded by PHPMyAdmin

See the screenshot below of how your wp_users table should look like.  Then press Go.forgot WordPress administrator password

Once you have done this, your WordPress administrator password is changed.  You will see on the next screen that the password field changed to a bunch of letters and numbers that you didn’t enter.

That’s ok, because that’s how MySQL stores your password. Don’t forget this password too 🙂

Go to your WordPress Administrator login and try out the new username and password you entered.

Change your password via FTP or the File Manager of CPanel

 You can also change the password by changing a file via FTP or using the CPanel File Manager.

  • Access the files of your website via FTP or File Manager and edit the functions.php file of your current theme
  • Edit the functions.php file and add the following to it, at the very top right after the first <?php
wp_set_password( 'password', 1 );
  • Change the ‘password’ text with your new password for the admin user. The reason why we put “1” is because the user ID number in the wp_users table of the Administrator is usually 1 – although sometimes it may not be the case. In that case, you’d have to use the above method via phpmyadmin
  • Save the modified file back to your site – replacing the old version and access the front-end of your website, and make sure you refresh the site at least once
  • After refreshing, you should be able to log in
  • VERY IMPORTANT: Make sure that you remove this code by following the same procedure. Besides being a vulnerability because the password is stored in plaintext, the code will reset your password each time you access your site until you remove it.

And these ladies and gentlemen are the easiest ways to reset the WordPress administrator password if you forgotten it!

Cheap ASP.NET 5 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting Provider Recommendation

Drupal is a free community supported framework for creating, organizing, presenting and managing a website. It powers millions of websites and applications from all over the world. Drupal makes it easy for contributors to publish to websites and easy for developers to deploy new sites as well as add features to existing ones. Most commonly referred to as a content management system, or CMS, Drupal has much more to offer. Drupal installations include a set of modules called Core Components, which provide features such as user management, menu systems, and user contributed content.

The Drupal open source community (one of the largest in the world) contributes and supports thousands of free flexible and robust modules and themes, which can be easily integrated into websites to offer powerful features such as multimedia, calendars, rating systems, and other social media tools. Drupal is also an application framework that can be used to build other aps. Drupal requires no programming skills yet the HTML code produced is accessible, cross browser compatible, and search engine friendly. Drupal is used for every type of site from personal blogs to highly trafficked enterprise level sites. 2% of all websites worldwide are built in Drupal including whitehouse.gov and many other high profile, highly visited sites.

What is Drupal Used for?

Drupal is a great choice for building all manner of websites from simple 1 page personal websites to enterprise level applications. It is particularly well suited to e-Learning systems, Community/social networking sites, and news publishing, where its powerful authoring and publishing features allow administrators to create, revise, and deploy content in a rapid and organized manner. User management, site reporting and statistics, ad management, community management, and other administrative functions utilize an intuitive and robust back-end user interface.

Are you looking for Cheap Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your Drupal 9.0.7 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Cheap Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting Provider Recommendation

logo-asphostportal1
discountservice-icon
logo-ukwindowshostaspnet
ASPHostPortal DiscountService.biz UKWindowsHostASP.NET
$1.00/month $2.00/month £3.00/month
Host 1 Site Host 1 Site Host 5 Sites
1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space
10 GB Bandwidth 10 GB Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap Drupal 9.0.7 Hosting Provider Recommendation?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 4.4.2 Hosting

Best, Cheap and Reliable PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting Provider

PrestaShop is an open source e-commerce solution that is used freely by more than 120,000 online stores worldwide. It comes with over 275 features being carefully developed in order to increase business owners’ sales with minimal efforts required. All the software features are absolutely free.

PrestaShop is free software as it’s specified in the GNU General Public License and officially started in August 2007 for small and medium-size businesses. The software, based on the Smartly template engine, nowadays is used by more than 100,000 shops all over the world.

PrestaShop has a good record and even was awarded the title of the Best Open Source E-Commerce Application in the Packt 2010 Open Source Awards and the Best Open Source Business Application in the 2011 Open Source Awards.

It supports various payment systems such as PayPal, Google Checkout, Payments Pro via API, Authorize.net and Skrill. It is used on Apache web server 1.3 or later, with PHP 5 or later and MySQL 5 running on it.

About 41 languages are available to different degrees, but only English and French have full support in all the versions. In the admin panel AJAX is used extensively in the software. Module blocks can be added easily to the online store to supply with extra functionality.

Think of managing a dynamic product list at the PrestaShop back-office: administrative interface helps you manage with one-click most complex inventory updates. PrestaShop has a one-page checkout, provides customers with a great number of options to view the chosen products, reliable shipping options along with control logistics ( fees, shipping restrictions, weight and many more) and the ability to attach custom messages. So you can see that PrestaShop will do its best to simplify and make more comfortable customers’ work. When speaking about defying taxes according to customer’s localization, PrestaShop has an advanced tracking system as well as customizable exchange rates. The customers can also choose the preferred currency.

New Features in PrestaShop 1.7.6.7

PrestaShop 1.7.6.7 is now available. It fixes an important regression introduced in 1.7.6.6.

1.7.6.7 is available!

In 1.7.6.6, one of the Front Office JavaScript files was modified through the usage of a linter. The modification inadvertently introduced a regression resulting in a script error in the Product page.

The main consequence of this regression is that some events usually fired on product page are not executed. This may produce a malfunction in Front Office modules which expect the updateProduct event to be dispatched on this page.

In 1.7.6.7 the changes wrongly introduced in 1.7.6.6 have been reverted.

In order to ensure your shop is able to interact correctly with modules being enabled on the Front Office product page, we advise upgrading to 1.7.6.7 as soon as possible. Of course, as always, don’t forget to backup before.

Reminder: the 1-Click Upgrade module’s latest version is v4.10.1, don’t forget to upgrade it.

Main fix

Front-office regression:

  • JS crashes on FO product page in 1.7.6.6, preventing updateProduct event to be received #20044

Are you looking for Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Cheap and Reliable PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting

logo-asphostportal1
discountservice-icon
logo-ukwindowshostaspnet
ASPHostPortal DiscountService.biz UKWindowsHostASP.NET
$1.00/month $2.00/month £3.00/month
Host 1 Site Host 1 Site Host 5 Sites
1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space
10 GB Bandwidth 10 GB Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap and Reliable PrestaShop v1.7.6.7 Hosting?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap SQL Server 2016 Hosting Recommendation

How to Delete All Pending Comments in WordPress

Do you have a lot of pending comments in WordPress that you want to delete? This can easily happen if you get a lot of spam comments.

Normally, deleting comments in WordPress is easy, but it gets trickier when there is a large number of pending comments. You may even come across weird errors while bulk deleting comments if there are too many of them.

In this article, we’ll show you how to easily bulk delete all pending comments in WordPress, step by step.

What Are Pending Comments in WordPress?

Pending comments in WordPress are the comments that are awaiting moderation.

You’ll find them in the WordPress admin area by visiting the ‘Comments’ page and switching to the ‘Pending’ tab.

The number of pending comments showing in the WordPress admin sidebar and on the dashboard

We recommend users turn on comment moderation on all their websites to combat comment spam. This means all comments on your website will go to the Pending queue before they are approved.

Why would anyone want to delete pending comments?

There are many scenarios when you may need to do that. For instance:

  • Akismet anti-spam plugin got disabled on your site and suddenly all spam comments are appearing in pending.
  • You simply forgot about a website, and it gathered hundreds of comments that are no longer relevant.
  • Articles on your website generating a lot of unwanted comments
  • You forgot to turn off comments on older posts

It can take a long time to go through and moderate each comment individually. If you are confident that there are no comments marked ‘pending’ that you want to keep, then you can simply bulk delete them all.

1. Deleting All Pending Comments in WordPress Manually

If you only have a few hundred pending comments, it’s quite quick to delete them manually.

Simply go to the ‘Comments’ page in WordPress admin area and then click on the ‘Pending’ tab to see a list of all your pending comments.

By default, this list will show 20 pending comments at a time. To change this, click on the ‘Screen Options’ tab at the top-right corner of the page.

Opening up the screen options tab on the pending comments page

Next, type ‘100’ into the ‘Number of items per page’ and click the Apply button:

Changing the pagination for the comments to fit more on each page

Now that you have 100 comments displaying, simply check the box to the left of ‘Author’ at the top of the list of comments. This selects all the comments on the page:

Check the box to the left of Author to select all comments on the page

Then, click on the ‘Bulk actions’ dropdown and select the ‘Move to Trash’ option. Go ahead and click the Apply button to move all those comments into the trash:

Bulk selecting the pending comments and moving them to the trash

WordPress will automatically show the next 100 comments on the page. Simply repeat the process to remove these too.

When you delete any comment on WordPress, it is not deleted right away. Instead, it is sent to the ‘Trash’ and will remain there for 30-days. After that, it will be automatically deleted permanently.

If you would rather delete them permanently right away, then you need to switch to the ‘Trash’ tab on the ‘Comments’ page and then click on the ‘Empty Trash’ button.

Emptying the trash to delete all the pending comments from WordPress

You will then see a message confirming that those comments have been deleted:

WordPress showing a message to confirm that the comments have been permanently deleted

Note: You can use the Screen Options to show up to 999 comments per page. However, this will increase the load on your WordPress hosting servers and slow down your site. You might also see an error message like this one when you try to move comments to the trash:

Error message shown when trying to move too many comments to the trash at one time

If you have more than a few hundred pending comments, then we recommend using a plugin method to delete them.

2. Deleting Large Number of Pending Comments in WordPress Using a Plugin

The quickest way to delete a very large number of pending comments is to use a plugin.

This will delete your pending (and spam) comments permanently. We recommend making a backup of your WordPress site before proceeding, just in case you change your mind later.

First, you need to install and activate the Delete Pending Comments plugin.

Upon activation, go to the Comments » Delete Pending Comments page in your WordPress admin. You will see a message letting you know how many pending comments there are.

Note: This figure includes spam comments, which are deleted at the same time as the pending comments.

The Delete Pending Comments page in the WordPress admin

To delete all the pending comments, you need to type the required line of text into the box. You can copy and paste this text if you prefer.

After that, go ahead and click the ‘Delete Pending Comments’ button.

Enter the line of text in order to delete the pending comments

You will then see a message confirming that all pending and spam comments have been deleted.

Message confirming that all pending and spam comments have been deleted

Deleting Spam Comments Only in WordPress

What if you don’t want to delete pending comments but just want to delete the ones that are marked as spam? That’s very easy to do in WordPress.

First, go to Comments in your WordPress admin and click on the Spam tab:

Click on the Spam tab to see a list of comments that have been marked as spam

Next, click the Empty Spam button. This will delete all spam comments permanently, not just the ones on the current page:

Empty the spam to permanently delete all spam comments

We hope this article helped you learn how to delete all pending comments in WordPress.

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 4.4.2 Hosting

Cheap Node.js v14.10.0 Hosting – Dedicated Cloud Server

Cheap Node.js v14.10.0 Hosting – Dedicated Cloud Server

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 4.4.2 Hosting

Node.js is a runtime system for creating (mostly) server-side applications. It’s best known as a popular means for JavaScript coders to build real-time Web APIs.

But Node.js is not a JavaScript framework; indeed, several authors have written excellent frameworks specifically for Node.js, including Express.js, Restify.js, and Hapi.js. So what exactly is this phenomenon finding its way into Web applications, operating systems wrappers, microcontrollers, and robots?

At it’s core, Node.js is a stripped-down, highly customizable server engine — a proto-server, if you will — because out of the box it doesn’t do anything until you set it up. This proto-server processes in a loop, ready to accept and respond to requests. Any of those requests themselves may initiate other requests to some other part of the system, such as to read a file off of disk or to send a signal to spin a motor on a robot arm. That loop, known as the event loop, is the “runtime” part.

Node.js ships with workhorse connectors and libraries such as those relating to HTTP, SSL, compression, filesystem access, and raw TCP and UDP. JavaScript, already tuned for a Web browser’s event loop environment for GUI and network events, is a great language for wiring up these connectors. You can snap connectors onto the event loop almost as easily as you can snap Lego parts together. Doing so lets you create a simple, dynamic Web server in just a few lines of JavaScript.

What’s New in Node.js v14.10.0?

Notable Changes

  • [2ab33c58ae] – (SEMVER-MINOR) buffer: also alias BigUInt methods (Anna Henningsen) #34960
  • [44d89a9faa] – (SEMVER-MINOR) crypto: add randomInt function (Oli Lalonde) #34600
  • [8aac42caf2] – (SEMVER-MINOR) perf_hooks: add idleTime and event loop util (Trevor Norris) #34938
  • [4bb40078da] – (SEMVER-MINOR) stream: simpler and faster Readable async iterator (Robert Nagy) #34035
  • [ffae5f3809] – (SEMVER-MINOR) stream: save error in state (Robert Nagy) #34103

Are you looking for Cheap Node.js v14.10.0 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap Node.js v14.10.0 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your Node.js v14.10.0 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap Node.js v14.10.0 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap Node.js v14.10.0 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable Node.js v14.10.0 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

If you know JavaScript, Node.js is a gentle on-ramp to asynchronous computing for the Web. And it just so happens that Node.js is suited to solve Web problems exactly of this type: integration and glue challenges, with cascading calls to API after API.

Where does Node.js not work so well? It’s not totally appropriate in places where a single-threaded calculation is going to be the holdup, like some kinds of successive approximation or classification. In those instances, it’s more efficient for Node.js to drop the request to an independent library that’s dedicated to the task, where it can be distributed across hundreds or thousands of processors.

Node.js is maturing quickly and is being deployed in more and more mission-critical and revenue-critical systems, such as eCommerce Black Friday infrastructures. It’s easy to get started with Node.js, and yet Node.js is deep enough to handle modern Web complexities. If you’re building your next generation Web site — especially APIs for mobile and Web integration — or if you are creating something new that depends on underlying services itself, Node.js is a runtime system that could very well work for you.

Cheap Node.js® v14.10.0 Hosting – Dedicated Cloud Server

 

logo-asphostportal1
discountservice-icon
logo-ukwindowshostaspnet
ASPHostPortal DiscountService.biz UKWindowsHostASP.NET
$1.00/month $2.00/month £3.00/month
Host 1 Site Host 1 Site Host 5 Sites
1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space
10 GB Bandwidth 10 GB Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap Node.js® v14.10.0 Hosting – Dedicated Cloud Server?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap Drupal 8.0.6 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap and Reliable ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 Hosting Recommendation

Microsoft has renamed its next-generation web application framework ASP.NET Core 3.1.8, previously known as ASP.NET 5. In addition, the forthcoming Entity Framework 7, a database framework, will now be called ASP.NET Core 3.1.8.

Entity Framework Core 3.1.8 (EF Core) is Microsoft’s reboot of Entity Framework for the new “mobile first, cloud first” world. According to the roadmap, EF Core will become the official version at some point in the future when the team feels that they have a critical mass of important ORM features implemented. Entity Framework is Microsoft’s recommended data access technology for new applications.

Are you looking for Best ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 Hosting? Finding a high quality Best ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Best ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Best ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 / EF Core 3.1.8 Hosting Recommendation

logo-asphostportal1
logo-hostforlife

logo-ukwindowshostaspnet
ASPHostPortal HostForLIFE.eu UKWindowsHostASP.NET
$1.0.10/month €3.1.80/month £3.1.80/month
Host 1 Site Host Unlimited Site Host 5 Sites
1 GB Disk Space Unlimited Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space
10 GB Bandwidth Unlimited Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap ASP.NET Core 3.1.8 Hosting Recommendation

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

Cheap Umbraco 7.4.1 Hosting Recommendation

Top 10 Node.js Performance Tips

Javascript has witnessed exponential growth in the field of app development. And that too, with the inception of Node JS, the growth has been doubled. Node JS needs no introduction as it is the best in the industry of building top-class web servers with unmatched quality.

Moreover, the Node JS can build quick and scalable applications, which is an added advantage apart from its asynchronous and event-driven nature. Delivering high-end performance is what Node JS is known for, and that ensures a quality project as well.

Well, we cannot completely favor Node JS by highlighting its good side, there may be some common Node JS mistakes from which it may have gained a lot of learnings. Also, the mistakes might have impacted the performance as well.

This article will elaborate on a few Node.js Performance Tips that could boost the throughput, reduce the latency rate, and ensure maximum productivity from the app professionals.

1. Restrictive Use Of Synchronous Functions

Asynchronous API doesn’t let you down in delivering high performance. As you might be knowing that the Node JS is single-threaded, which means it has numerous synchronous components that would block the apps.

This may end up slowing down the performance, which could deliver not so desired results. Below is an attached code snippet which explains the operations read by file by sync and async:

// Asynchronous
fs.readFile('file.txt', function(err, buffer) {
  var content = buffer.toString();
});

// Synchronous
var content = fs.readFileSync('file.txt').toString();

2. Use Gzip Compression

Another addition to Node.js performance tips is the usage of gzip compression. It helps in compressing or decompressing the files. This can be elaborated; when a browser asks for a resource, a server to save time and reduce the latency rate will compress the response.

Using gzip at the time of either answering the clients or requesting the server operating remotely would ensure a great boost to the performance.

3. Lightweight and Small Code

If you are successful in making your web app’s code light in weight and small size, then you have won half the battle. The reduction in code size could result in boosting the productivity ratio and saves time. This can prove to be an effective tip to improve Node JS speed.

Also, there should be restrictions in unnecessary things that can hamper performance, like using a heavy framework that may drain a lot of RAM, using irrelevant modules, and many more things.

Moreover, there is another way that can contribute in enhancing performance, which is by combining various Javascript files into one.

4. Parallel Approach

Developing web apps would ask for multiple internal calls for extracting out data or information. There are multiple functions, and this process could consume a lot of time, which can also affect the performance of the application.

Here, executing the functions parallelly is possible with the help of Node JS as it has asynchronous nature. It can improve the Node JS speed as well as performance. The independent functions can be run parallelly. Also, it would eliminate the middleware functions that will add up in improving the speed.

Below is the code snippet to understand the parallelizability of functions working together:

function runInParallel() {
  async.parallel([
    getUserProfile,
    getRecentActivity,
    getSubscriptions,
    getNotifications
  ], function(err, results) {
    //This callback runs when all the functions complete
  });
}

5. User Caching

Caching is the process wherein you can store the often-used data or not so modifying data or information, which may improve Node JS speed in loading and also saves a lot of time. It will be better understood by the below snippet that clearly shows the recent data on display:

var router = express.Router();

router.route('/latestPosts').get(function(req, res) {
  Post.getLatest(function(err, posts) {
    if (err) {
      throw err;
    }

    res.render('posts', { posts: posts });
  });
});

It is done only on the frequent posts to speed up the loading time. The data which are rarely used should not be excluded from caching.

6. Render Static Assets Without Using Node JS

Well, not using Node JS for rendering the static content would be another tip for boosting Node JS performance. Yes, you read it, right! Nginx, a standard web server, should be used to render static assets like CSS or images.

This will help in reducing the memory load on Node JS and will also not impact the performance of the application.

7. Front-End Rendering

Angular JS and Backbone JS are the front-end frameworks that follow the MVC architectural pattern, which makes it possible to construct single-page applications. It automatically delivers the responses to the client bypassing the server, which allows the developers to understand which APIs are responsible for it.

If you want to save your bandwidth, then use front-end rendering in Node JS, which will also help you in reducing the latency rate and increasing the productive ratio. Moreover, it turns out to be a potential tip for boosting Node JS speed & performance.

8. No Storing

Session data can lead to overload the memory as it gets stored by default. The excess storing of data would even hamper the performance. So, it is advisable either not to store data in sessions or keep some other storage data.

For better understanding, let’s look at an example, you should store ID in of the user whoever uses your application instead of storing the entire object, which could reserve a lot of memory. For storing the data, you can use MongoDB or Redis.

9. Use of Standard V8 Functions

There are multiple collections like maps, reduce, and forEach that don’t have support from all the browsers. Well, it can be said that there can be compatibility issues, which can be one of the reasons for no bolstering of collections.

But, with the help of Node JS’s Google V8 JS engine, you will get to know the supported operations and collections. This can be leveraged for diverting the collections on the back-end.

10. Resolve Memory Leaks

Node JS performance tips include resolving of memory leaks issues. As Node JS V8 engine has a garbage collector that helps in processing the inactive and unused memory by cleaning it so that it can be used whenever required.

The garbage collector can sometimes fail to clean the memory, which needs to be fixed it asap. It is 10x tougher to track or monitor memory leakage, but memory heap snapshots can help you in verifying classes and objects that are growing at a gradual rate.

Conclusions

The memory leak is a major problem in Node JS, which could hamper the performance of the applications. The Node.js Performance Tips mentioned above should be strictly implemented to enhance or boost performance.

Undoubtedly, it requires more improvements, but until the time the new improvement comes, this effective measure can help in advancing the speed of applications.

If you want to boost the performance of your Node JS application, then you can hire Node JS developer, who will help you in setting up your project. The team is qualified, skilled, and have years of hands-on experience in building quality projects.

Cheap ASP.NET 4.6 Hosting Recommendation

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 5.5 Hosting

What’s New in WordPress 5.5?

With WordPress 5.5 behind the corner, it’s time for us to introduce the most noticeable changes and features being added to Core with the second WordPress release of the year.

These days, we are used to seeing many additions to the block editor at each WordPress release. WordPress 5.5 is no exception!

While WordPress 5.5 brings many changes to WordPress Core, several features awaited with 5.5 have been delayed and removed from this version because of several unresolved issues. So, full-site editing, navigation block, navigation screen, and widget screen aren’t part of WordPress 5.5.

What’s New With The Block Editor

With the final release of WordPress 5.5, ten versions of the Gutenberg plugin will be added to the core, bringing a huge number of UI improvements, features, enhancements, and bug fixes affecting every aspect of the editing experience, from usability to functionality and performance.

It’d be close to impossible to mention all these changes here, so in this post, you’ll just find a hand-picked selection of our favorite new features and improvements.

New UI Design

Each version of the Gutenberg plugin brings small and not-so-small improvements that are silently changing the overall editing experience. A lot of these changes are now going to be merged into WordPress core. So, when you first launch the block editor in WordPress 5.5, a slightly different interface should grab your attention.

Inline Image Editing

A new editing feature has been added to the block editor with Gutenberg 8.4 allowing users to edit images directly from the Image block.

Now it’s been merged to core and, as of WordPress 5.5, you can crop, rotate, zoom and adjust image positions without the need to launch the Media Library resulting in a faster editing experience.

If you use to publish tons of photos, no doubt you’ll enjoy this feature.

Block Categories and New Block Inserter Panel

A redesigned block inserter panel shows up blocks and patterns by categories, significantly improving the editing experience and making blocks and patterns easier to find (Gutenberg 8.3).

The Block Directory and Block Plugins

With the implementation of the block directory, you can find, install, and add third-party blocks directly from the block inserter.

When you search for a block, if you haven’t it already installed, you’ll be prompted a list of plugins available in the Plugin Directory. Those plugins are called “block plugins” and you can add them to your editor with a single click.

Block Patterns

Back in March 2020, Gutenberg 7.7 and Gutenberg 7.8 introduced block patterns and the block patterns API for themes and plugins.

Block patterns are predefined block layouts allowing users to quickly add complex structures of nested blocks to their pages. Their intent is to help content writers and site admins to overcome the “blank page syndrome” and build professional layouts and advanced views with ease.

We should see block patterns at their best with full-site editing.

Native Image Lazy-Loading in WordPress Core

Lazy loading is an optimization technique that defers loading of non-critical resources. This means that the browser is instructed to load visible content on page load and defer the downloading and rendering of images placed below the fold until they are actually needed.

Native Lazy Loading in WordPress

As Felix Arntz reported in an old blog post on Make WordPress Core blog a JavaScript implementation of lazy loading in WordPress was initially proposed a couple of years ago, but it never became part of the Core. The new implementation of native lazy image loading removes any compatibility concern and now the new feature can safely be merged into the Core with WordPress 5.5.

Lazy Loading for WordPress Developers

Developers can override the default behavior using several new filters. Among those filters, wp_lazy_loading_enabled and wp_img_tag_add_loading_attr are the most useful for developers:

  • wp_lazy_loading_enabled turns the loading attribute on and off. This filter can be applied globally or per tag.
  • wp_img_tag_add_loading_attr filters the loading attribute value and provides a way to control lazy loading per image.

Auto-Updates for Plugins and Themes

One of the greatest concerns for site owners is site security and keeping your software up to date is a common recommendation every site owner should take into account.

WordPress Automatic updates have been available as a feature since WordPress 3.7. Now, the problem here is that while automatic updates are enabled by default for core maintenance and security releases, before WordPress 5.5, many site owners didn’t take advantage of auto-updates for plugins and themes.

Reason being that this feature required basic knowledge of WordPress development. In fact, developers could fine-tune their update preferences by defining one or more constants in wp-config.php or using a filter in a plugin.

Now with WordPress 5.5, site admins can toggle plugin and theme auto-updates on and off with a single click directly in their WordPress dashboard.

Auto-Update Functions and Filters for Plugin and Theme Developers

A new function and several filters allow WordPress developers to customize many aspects of plugin and theme auto-updates.

Extensible Core Sitemaps

A sitemap is simply a list of URLs allowing search engines to quickly crawl your website.

Sitemaps are quite similar to robots.txt, with the difference that a robots.txt file excludes content from being indexed, while a sitemap provides a list of URLs to be indexed by search engines.

Before WordPress 5.5, sitemaps could be only added to WordPress websites using a plugin or other tools.

Now, WordPress 5.5 brings a brand new XML sitemaps feature to WordPress Core.

The new feature adds basic functionality, but it comes with a good number of hooks and filters allowing plugin developers to further extend built-in functionalities.

Updating Plugins and Themes From a .zip File

I know what you’re thinking: it may seem quite “unexpected” to see this feature appearing in conjunction with automatic updates. Nonetheless, it does make sense.

Before WordPress 5.5, when lacking a one-click update feature, site admins could only upload plugin/theme updates via FTP/SFTP or file manager. That was mostly true with custom plugins/themes or with extensions hosted on third-party marketplaces.

Starting with WordPress 5.5, you can update plugins and themes by uploading a .zip package from your computer within your WordPress dashboard.

If you want to update a plugin, browse to Plugins > Add New screen and click on the Upload Plugin button. Then, if you have the plugin installed on your website, a new screen lets you know that “This plugin is already installed” and shows the current version and uploaded version details.

Are you looking for Cheap WordPress 5.5 Hosting? Finding a high quality Cheap WordPress 5.5 Hosting provider is crucial for your web application. Your WordPress 5.5 application can only run smooth if it will be hosted on a server which can provide a higher up time & plenty of computing resources. There’re thousands of web hosting providers which offer asp.net hosting, but choosing Cheap WordPress 5.5 Hosting provider is a time consuming task. To make your buying decision easy we’ve concluded 3 Best yet Cheap WordPress 5.5 Hosting providers which are reliable and offer affordable WordPress 5.5 Hosting so that every one can afford it.

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 5.5 Hosting

logo-asphostportal1
discountservice-icon
logo-ukwindowshostaspnet
ASPHostPortal DiscountService.biz UKWindowsHostASP.NET
$1.00/month $2.00/month £3.00/month
Host 1 Site Host 1 Site Host 5 Sites
1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space 1 GB Disk Space
10 GB Bandwidth 10 GB Bandwidth 20 GB Bandwidth
Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool Dedicated Application Pool
Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains Support UTF-8 Domains
30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back 30-Days Money Back
Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET Latest ASP.NET
Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel Plesk Control Panel
Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012 Windows 2008/2012
SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014 SQL Server 2008/2012/2014
Latest MySql version Latest MySql version Latest MySql version

How to Choose Cheap and Reliable WordPress 5.5 Hosting?

Reliability and Speed of Access

Not only should the web host be reliable and fast, it should guarantee its uptime (the time when it is functional). Look for a minimum uptime of 99%. In fact, even 99% is actually too low — it really should be 99.5% or higher. The host should provide some sort of refund (eg prorated refund or discount) if it falls below that figure. Note though that guarantees are often hard to enforce from your end — especially if the host denies there was any downtime. However, without that guarantee, the web host will have little incentive to ensure that its servers are running all the time.

Data Transfer (Traffic/Bandwidth)

Data transfer (sometimes loosely referred to as “traffic” or “bandwidth”) is the amount of bytes transferred from your site to visitors when they browse your site.

Don’t believe any commercial web host that advertises “unlimited bandwidth”. The host has to pay for the bandwidth, and if you consume a lot of it, they will not silently bear your costs. Many high bandwidth websites have found this out the hard way when they suddenly receive an exorbitant bill for having “exceeded” the “unlimited bandwidth”. Always look for details on how much traffic the package allows. I personally always stay clear of any host that advertises “unlimited transfer”, even if the exact amount is specified somewhere else (sometimes buried in their policy statements). Usually you will find that they redefine “unlimited” to be limited in some way.

In addition, while bandwidth provided is something you should always check, do not be unduly swayed by promises of incredibly huge amounts of bandwidth. Chances are that your website will never be able to use that amount because it will hit other limits, namely resource limits.

To give you a rough idea of the typical traffic requirements of a website, most new sites that don’t provide video or music on their site use less than 3 GB of bandwidth per month. Your traffic requirements will grow over time, as your site becomes more well-known, so you will need to also check their policy when you exceed your data transfer limit: is there a published charge per GB over the allowed bandwidth? Is the charge made according to actual usage or are you expected to pre-pay for a potential overage? It is better not to go for hosts that expect you to prepay for overages, since it is very hard to forsee when your site will exceed its bandwidth and by how much.

Disk space

For the same reason as bandwidth, watch out also for those “unlimited disk space” schemes. Many new sites (that don’t host videos or music) need less than 20 MB of web space, so even if you are provided with a host that tempts you with 100 GB (or “unlimited space”), be aware that you are unlikely to use that space, so don’t let the 100 GB space be too big a factor in your consideration when comparing with other web hosts. The hosting company is also aware of that, which is why they feel free to offer you that as a means of enticing you to host there.

Technical support

Does its technical support function 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (often abbreviated 24/7), all year around? Note that I will not accept a host which does not have staff working on weekends or public holidays. You will be surprised at how often things go wrong at the most inconvenient of times. Incidentally, just because a host advertises that it has 24/7 support does not necessarily mean that it really has that kind of support. Test them out by emailing at midnight and on Saturday nights, Sunday mornings, etc. Check out how long they take to respond. Besides speed of responses, check to see if they are technically competent. You wouldn’t want to sign up with a host that is run by a bunch of salesmen who only know how to sell and not fix problems.

Email, Autoresponders, POP3, Mail Forwarding

If you have your own site, you will probably want to have email addresses at your own domain, like [email protected], etc. Does the host allow you to set up whatever email addresses you want on your domain, so that mail can be forwarded to your current email address, or placed into a mail box on your web hosting account itself? Can you set an email address to automatically reply to the sender with a preset message (called an autoresponder)? Can you retrieve your mail with your email software?

Control Panel

This is called various names by different hosts, but essentially, they all allow you to manage different aspects of your web account yourself. Typically, and at the very minimum, it should allow you to do things like add, delete, and manage your email addresses, and change passwords for your account. I will not sign up with a host where I have to go through their technical support each time I want to change a password or add/delete an email account. Such tasks are common maintenance chores that every webmaster performs time and time again, and it would be a great hassle if you had to wait for their technical support to make the changes for you.

Web Server and Operating System

Is the type of operating system and server important?

In general, most people will want to sign up for a web host offering a Unix-based system (like Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD) and running the Apache web server. Most web-based software assume your website is running on such a system, and you will usually experience fewer compatibility issues with it. There are also a lot of guides available on the Internet on configuring such systems, so finding help when you need it is easier as well.

In my opinion, the only time when you will want to use a Windows server is if you’re running Windows-specific programs, like ASP scripts. But even then, you’ll probably be better off looking for a PHP-equivalent, and using a Unix-based system.

Price

I was actually hesitant to list this, but I guess it’s futile not to. However, I would caution that while price is always a factor, you should realise (“realize” in US English) that you often get what you pay for, although it’s not necessarily true that the most expensive hosts are the best.

Monthly/Quarterly/Annual Payment Plans

Most web hosts allow you to select an annual payment plan that gives you a cheaper rate than if you were to pay monthly. My current personal preference is to pay monthly with all new web hosts until I’m assured of their reliability and honesty. Paying monthly allows me to switch web hosts quickly when I find that the current host does not meet my requirements: this way, I’m not tied down to a bad web host because I have prepaid for an entire year. I do this even if the new web host guarantees that they will refund the balance if I’m dissatisfied, since at the point I sign up, I have no assurance that they will honour their guarantee. Later (usually after a couple of years), when I’m satisfied with the host, I may change payment plans to the discounted annual plans.

Resellers?

Not all hosting companies own or lease their own web servers. Some of them are actually resellers for some other hosting company. The disadvantage of using a reseller is the possibility that you are dealing with people who don’t know much about the system they are selling and who take longer to help you (they have to transmit your technical support request to the actual hosting company for it to be acted upon). However, this also depends on both the reseller and the underlying hosting company. It is thus wise not to rule out all resellers; there are a number of reliable and fast ones who are actually quite good and cheap. In fact, a number of resellers sell the same packages cheaper than their original hosting company. If you find out that a particular company is a reseller, you will need to investigate both the reseller and the real hosting company.

International

If you don’t stay in the USA, you have the option of hosting your site with some local provider. The advantage here is the ease of dealing with them (they are after all easily accessible by phone call or a visit), your familiarity with the local laws and easy recourse to those laws should it be necessary. It should be your choice if your target audience is local (eg a local fast food delivery service). On the other hand, hosting it in USA has the advantage of faster access for what is probably the largest number of your overseas visitors (particularly if you have an English-speaking audience). You also have a large number of hosting companies to choose from, and as a result, cheaper prices too.

error: Content is protected !!