• sales@superblogads.com

Category ArchiveHosting Article

Cheap phpBB 3.1.9 Hosting Recommendation

Easy Way to Speed up Your Prestashop Website

Prestashop provides a number of options to speed up Prestashop website and to optimize its performance. This optimization process gives you the ability to increase the speed of loading and enhance the performance of your Prestashop installation. This article describes the caching and performance options available with the new interface of Prestashop.

Configuring the Smarty template engine

Prestashop uses a PHP template engine called Smarty. Below are the steps for the configuration of this template engine.

  • Navigate to performance page and to the Smarty section in the page.
  • Click the “Recompile templates if the files have been updated” from the Template Cache
  • Set Cache toggle to “Yes”.

The 3Cs (Combine, Compress, Cache)

Prestashop combine, compress and cache lets you increase your site’s performance without using any coding expertise. These 3 terms describe a process conducted to optimize a single file to speed up the site loading. The main concept behind this is making a file smaller to increase its performance. The CCC optimization options can be obtained by clicking Performance or in the Advanced Parameters menu.

The options provided are given below.

  • CSS Smart cache for css

CSS or Cascading Style Sheets are present to add styles and formatting to your web pages. But the large number of CSS files present can decrease the performance. This cache feature combines all files into a single CSS file to reduce the requests sent to the server for each visit of the website.

  • Smart cache for JavaScript

JavaScript Smart cache follows the same procedure as CSS smart cache and combines all the JavaScript files into one file to increase the loading speed of the website and improve Prestashop performance.

  • Minify HTML

This process involves the removal of unnecessary code from the     HTML. These unwanted portions of code include whitespace, commented code and other characters the removal of which will increase the loading speed for Prestashop optimization.

  • Compressing inline JavaScript in HTML

A process that is somewhat similar to the above. But the code that is optimized is the inline JavaScript found in the HTML code to speed up loading of the site.

  • Move JavaScript to the end

Move all JavaScript files to bottom of your website, this helps the site loads faster.

  • Apache Optimization

Involves the addition of htaccess code which helps to improve caching in the Apache server.

Media Servers

The usage of media servers gives you the ability for offloading static content to another server. It is called a CDN or a Content Delivery Network. It is required by Prestashop for these options to be used with the CCC options given in the description above. It also states that to use cookie-less content, entering to another domain/subdomain is essential. This is a precaution taken for the website security.

Given below are the steps to follow when using multiple servers

  1. Enter the domain/subdomain name of server in the field provided.
  2. Save the entry by clicking on save from the bottom right corner.

Caching options

Prestashop’s performance can be improved extensively by using different caching options. Caching can also be enabled or disabled according to your requirement. But these Prestashop cache options require the enabling of server extension. The least efficient caching option is the file system cache which uses the hard drive.

Cache options:

  • APC cache – Alternative PHP cache works with a single server and is not present for accounts that use shared server hosting. And can only be installed on servers for which you have complete access. If InMotion hosting is used, it can be installed on VPS or on dedicated server accounts of which you have root access.
  • Memecache – Works best with multiple server websites. But your server’s PHP configuration must enable Memecache for it to be selected. Like APC cache, Memecache can only be installed on servers for which you have complete access. If InMotion hosting is used, it can be installed on VPS or on dedicated server accounts of which you have root access.
  • Xcache – Lighttpd server is required for this and it can’t be used with the InMotion hosting servers. This is because of their usage of websites hosted by Apache server.

Clicking on the radio button found next to the cache type you prefer to use and then clicking on the button named Add Server will enable the selected cache. Each and every option for caching found in Prestashop is linked to a website which gives all the necessary details about each type.

Ciphering algorithms

Ciphering is associated with cookies. In fact it refers to the encrypting algorithm used in cookie generation. The selected encrypting algorithm can be changed by clicking on the radio button in front of your preferred algorithm and clicking on Save in the bottom right.

Out of the given algorithms it is best to select Rijndael with mcrypt lib if you are more concerned about the performance since it works faster than custom BlowFish class. But for this, your web server should be mcrypt enabled.

Image management

Images are an ideal feature of your website. Therefore websites usually contain a large number of images. Prestashop provides many methods for managing these images.

To set the image size for images displayed with products, navigate to Images in Preferences and add preferred size.

To set the image quality there is another option when you navigate to images in Preferences.

Both the size and the quality of the images highly affects the loading time of your website. When images are of higher quality and larger in size, the loading time will be slower. If you want to speed up Prestashop website, it is best advised to use medium quality images.

Image management has become advanced with the newer versions of Prestashop. Image organization is an option provided in Prestashop 1.6 allowing the use of responsive design. This option enables the users to view the website and products without a difference regardless of the screen size of the device.

Another useful feature provided is the Regenerate Thumbnails option in Images. Even if you add different sized images, these can be brought to the same size using this option. To access the regenerate thumbnail option, navigate to the Images section. But if your website uses a large number of products, Regenerate Thumbnails setting will be generating that number of images when clicked and it might slow down your Prestashop site. Therefore it is essential to make sure to not use it when your site is busy.

Optional features

These features are some optional features when disabled will speed up Prestashop website.

  1. Navigate to “Optional Features” section in the Performance page.
  2. Set the Combinations toggle button to “No” if your site doesn’t contain products having combinations.
  3. Product Feature option can also be disabled from the same section which is enabled by default.
  4. Disabling Customer Group feature will make all customers individually subjected to pricing etc. and not group wise.
Best SugarCRM 7.7 Hosting Recommendation

The Best WordPress LMS Plugins to Build Online Courses in 2019

Knowledge is power.

That’s usually something people say when stressing the importance of education, but you never really appreciate how true that saying really is until you’re selling your own knowledge and experience. That’s when you see just how much people are willing to pay for education.

And all you need to turn that knowledge into a source of revenue is a WordPress site, a good LMS plugin, and marketing tools that boost engagement. In a few minutes, you can lay the groundwork for a profitable online educational course that leaves your subscribers hungry for more.

Ready to get started? Check out our list of favorite LMS plugins and learn which is right for your WordPress site.

1. LearnPress

Want a powerful WordPress LMS plugin, free of charge? If so, LearnPress is the perfect platform for you.

LearnPress puts you in the driver’s seat, enabling you to build and manage coursework any way you see fit. It comes with a wide range of free tools to help you get your courses off the ground. Best of all, LearnDash’s professional bundle makes it easy to expand your services as your content grows, so that you can meet the needs of new and existing subscribers. These premium features include:

  • Course certificates.
  • A content drip add-on.
  • Management tools for tracking students, grades, and course content.

LearnPress also has an extensive library of free and premium add-ons which you can integrate into your eCommerce site, so you can make individual adjustments to your platform while paying for only the add-ons you need.

Keep in mind that LearnPress doesn’t come with a setup wizard like most other WordPress LMS plugins. While you’re able to exercise more control over your content, creating lessons takes a little more time and work.

Price: Free / $249.99 for PRO Bundle

Ideal for: People looking to minimize start-up fees associated with their online courses.

Drawback: Lack of setup wizard can create a learning curve for beginners.

2. LifterLMS

Whether you’re offering a couple of individual programs or a collection of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), LifterLMS has everything you need, from content management tools to add-ons that target specific segments of your market.

Perfect for building comprehensive courses or training programs, LifterLMS makes it easy to expand on your content by adding course prerequisites, training modules, group memberships, and other tools you can use to customize coursework for specific individuals or entire classes.

But that’s not all. LifterLMS comes with a number of other awesome features that maximize engagement and customer satisfaction, including:

  • End-of-course certificates and achievement badges.
  • Automated emailing.
  • Support for Stripe, PayPal, and Authorize.net.

You can even integrate LifterLMS with other marketing tools, like MailChimp, WooCommerce, and WPForms to boost conversion rates even more.

Price: Between $99 and $999 a year, depending on the plan.

Ideal for: People who want to build scalable Learning Management Systems that cater to the unique needs of individuals and small groups.

Drawback: Can quickly become expensive if you need to purchase a lot of add-ons.

3. LearnDash

When it comes to accessibility, the LearnDash WordPress plugin is arguably one of the easiest and most convenient LMS plugins on the market. Its intuitive drag-and-drop design makes it simple for anyone to create quizzes, training programs, and exams with a click of a button.

LearnDash lets you create customized courses that meet the needs of your subscribers. Whether you’re setting prerequisites for students or you want to schedule content using its built-in drip feed feature, LearnDash makes it easier to optimize engagement every step of the way. Also, it’s one of the few WordPress LMS plugins to support SCORM.

Popular LearnDash features include:

  • The ability to choose between membership, subscription, and one-time pricing options.
  • Test and course management tools, like gradebooks, student metrics, and profiles.
  • Compatibility with most popular payment gateways.

Another awesome LearnDash feature is the optional Course Points setting. Here, students can earn points from completing tasks and lessons, and they can then spend those points unlocking new courses. Not only is it great for increasing engagement, but it’s also a great motivational tool that keeps students wanting more.

Price: Between $159 and $329 a year, depending on the plan. If you want a free alternative that offers many of the same features as LearnDash, take a look at MasterStudy LMS.

Ideal for: Anyone looking for a powerful WordPress education plugin that’s easy to set up and offers an ever-growing range of add-ons and third-party integrations.

Drawback: It has to be integrated with a third-party plugin like WooCommerce or Easy Digital Downloads in order to implement comprehensive payment options.

4. Sensei

Sensei is an LMS and WordPress course listing plugin created by Automattic, the same company behind WooCommerce and WordPress. As such, Sensei interacts smoothly with both platforms, making it easier for users to implement the plugin into their WordPress sites.

One of the biggest advantages you get with Sensei is its simplicity. It’s arguably one of the easiest plugins to navigate, making it an excellent choice for entrepreneurs searching for an online coaching plugin for their WordPress site.

However, Sensei doesn’t offer much beyond your basic LMS tools. You have to integrate it into WooCommerce in order to monetize your courses, and you’ll need to purchase additional add-ons if you want advanced features like certificates, content drip, and student management tools; all of which are features that come standard with many other WordPress Learning Management System plugins.

Price: Starting at $129 for one site.

Ideal for: Merchants already running a WooCommerce store and interested in basic LMS services.

Drawback: Not a lot of additional features or add-on support. Best suited for people running simple courses and short training programs.

5. WP Courseware

Powerful and easy to use, WP Courseware lets users create online courses with its intuitive drag-and-drop platform. Designed to be hassle-free and easy to learn, WP Courseware makes it possible to create custom-tailored courses in a matter of minutes.

Once you’ve got the structure of your course in place, you can use WP Courseware’s advanced tools to further customize your services. These features include:

  • Personalized emails sent automatically to students based on their activity.
  • Advanced testing tools like timers and retake limits.
  • Instructor and student gradebooks.

One thing to keep in mind if you go with WP Courseware is that the platform doesn’t come with its own payment processing gateway. If you want to monetize your content, you’ll need to integrate it with an eCommerce plugin that accepts payments.

Price: Starting at $129 a year for two sites.

Ideal for: Anyone looking to a flexible LMS plugin that’s convenient and quick to learn.

Drawback: No built-in payment support. If you’re looking for a plugin that’s just as user-friendly and has extensive payment support, try Good LMS.

Cheap Classic ASP Hosting Recommendation

Compressed Microsoft SQL Server Backups by Default

Backup Overview (SQL Server)

back up [verb]
Copies the data or log records from a SQL Server database or its transaction log to a backup device, such as a disk, to create a data backup or log backup.

backup [noun]
A copy of SQL Server data that can be used to restore and recover the data after a failure. A backup of SQL Server data is created at the level of a database or one or more of its files or filegroups. Table-level backups cannot be created. In addition to data backups, the full recovery model requires creating backups of the transaction log.

recovery model
A database property that controls transaction log maintenance on a database. Three recovery models exist: simple, full, and bulk-logged. The recovery model of database determines its backup and restore requirements.

restore
A multi-phase process that copies all the data and log pages from a specified SQL Server backup to a specified database, and then rolls forward all the transactions that are logged in the backup by applying logged changes to bring the data forward in time.

Types of backups

copy-only backup
A special-use backup that is independent of the regular sequence of SQL Server backups.

data backup
A backup of data in a complete database (a database backup), a partial database (a partial backup), or a set of data files or filegroups (a file backup).

database backup
A backup of a database. Full database backups represent the whole database at the time the backup finished. Differential database backups contain only changes made to the database since its most recent full database backup.

differential backup
A data backup that is based on the latest full backup of a complete or partial database or a set of data files or filegroups (the differential base) and that contains only the data extents that have changed since the differential base.

A differential partial backup records only the data extents that have changed in the filegroups since the previous partial backup, known as the base for the differential.

full backup
A data backup that contains all the data in a specific database or set of filegroups or files, and also enough log to allow for recovering that data.

log backup
A backup of transaction logs that includes all log records that were not backed up in a previous log backup. (full recovery model)

file backup
A backup of one or more database files or filegroups.

partial backup
Contains data from only some of the filegroups in a database, including the data in the primary filegroup, every read/write filegroup, and any optionally-specified read-only files.

Compressed Microsoft SQL Server Backups by Default

If you compress your database backups you can save a ton of disk space. But by default compressed backups are not created. In order to create a compress SQL Server database backup when your default is not compressed you need to add the “WITH COMPRESSION” option to your BACKUP command. Not a big deal to do, but if you want to always create a compressed backup it might be better to change the default backup type to be compressed. By doing that all our backup command that forget to add the “WITH COMPRESSION” option will be compressed by default.

Your default backup compression option is determined by a system configuration. You can determine how your system configuration is set for the default compression by running the following command:

EXEC sys.sp_configure N'backup compression default';

When you run the above command you will get some output that might look like this:

Here you can see the configured and run value for my backup compression default setting. Note that currently my backup compression default is set to zero (0). This means by default my backups are not compressed. Therefore when a BACKUP command is run that doesn’t have the WITH COMPRESSION option defined I will get an uncompressed backup.

To change the default backup compression options to be compressed you just need to run the following two statements:

EXEC sys.sp_configure N'backup compression default', N'1'
GO
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

By running these two command I have changed the default “backup compression default” value to 1. This is the value that will enable compressed backups by default.

Cheap Zikula 1.4.2 Hosting Recommendation

ASP.NET CORE – Learn CRUD Operations in ADO.NET

In this ASP.NET Core Tutorial you will learn to do CRUD operations in ADO.NET from the very beginning. This tutorial will help you to learn ADO.NET so that you can start doing database programming in ASP.NET CORE with C#.

Creating a new ASP.NET Core Web Application

In your Visual Studio, select ‘File > New Project’. A new window will get opened, here:

a. On the left side, select ‘Installed > Visual C# > Web’.

b. On the middle part, select ‘ASP.NET Core Web Application’.

c. On the lower part, give your project name as ‘CRUDADO’ or anything you want, and select the location on the drive where project files will be stored. Also select the option — ‘Create directory for solution’ and finally click the ‘OK’ button to create your project.

Next, a new window will open that ask you to select the project template, dot net framework and a few more things. In this window make sure you select these things:

a. On the 2 drop downs at the top, select ‘.NET Core’ and ‘ASP.NET Core 2.0’. You can also select ASP.NET Core version greater than 2.0.

b. Select the ‘Empty’ project template.

c. Click the ‘OK’ button to create your ASP.NET Core Web Application

Configuring ASP.NET Core Web Application

Your application should have support of MVC framework, routing and Static files. All this can be done from the ‘Startup.cs’ class which is located in the root of the application.

Open the Startup.cs class and add these supports inside the ConfigureServices() and Configure() methods as shown below:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Builder;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
namespace CRUDADO
{
public class Startup
{
public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
services.AddMvc();
}
        public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
{
app.UseStaticFiles();
app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage();
app.UseMvc(routes =>
{
routes.MapRoute(
name: "default",
template: "{controller=Home}/{action=Index}/{id?}");
});
}
}
}

Create Layout, ViewImports, ViewStart and add Bootstrap

Create ‘Views’ folder in the root of your project, and inside it create a ‘Shared’ folder.

Next, right click on the ‘Shared’ folder, and select ‘Add > New Item’. You will get a new window showing the item list, from this list select ‘MVC View Layout Page’ and click the ‘Add’ button.

This will add _Layout.cshtml file in the Shared folder and it will be open for editing. You need to add the following code to it:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>@ViewData["Title"]</title>
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width" />
<link href="/lib/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.css" rel="stylesheet" />
</head>
<body class="m-1 p-1">
@RenderBody()
</body>
</html>

Next, download the Bootstrap Package and extract the Bootstrap zip file contents inside the ‘wwwroot > lib’ folder of your project.

Bootstrap is used to create responsive layout that are mobile friendly. It is the most popular CSS framework in the world.

Next, right click on the ‘Views’ folder and select ‘Add > New Item’. On the items list, select ‘MVC View Imports Page’ and click the ‘Add’ button. This will add _ViewImports.cshtml file.

Import the built-in tag helpers & models namespace for the Views, by adding the following code to this file:

@using CRUDADO.Models
@addTagHelper *, Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.TagHelpers

In the same way, right click the ‘Views’ folder and select ‘Add > New Item’. On the items list, select ‘MVC View Start Page’ and click the ‘Add’ button.

This will add the _ViewStart.cshtml file with the following initial code:

@{
Layout = "_Layout";
}

It tells that all the Views will have the Layout from the _Layout.cshtml file which is located inside the Shared folder.

Creating a Database

You must have SQL Server 2017 (any edition) installed in your PC. However, any other edition of SQL Server like 2016, 2008, 2012, will work.

Next, you need to connect to the SQL Server which you can do with SQL Server Object Explorer in Visual Studio. So select ‘View > SQL Server Object Explorer in Visual Studio’ in Visual Studio.

When ‘SQL Server Object Explorer’ window opens, right click on the SQL Server node and select Add SQL Server.

Next, a Connect window opens up. In this window, select the ‘Browse’ tab then click on the ‘Local’ node to open it.

Inside this node, select the 2nd option that says (localdb)\MSSQLLocalDB. After selecting it, you will notice the ‘Server Name:’ field, in the same window, now has the (localdb)\MSSQLLocalDB value.

Now you have to simply click the Connect button to connect to the SQL Server. See the below image:

In a few seconds time the SQL Server will be connected and ready to use.

Next, right click on Databases node and select Add New Database.

In the dialog box, enter School as the database name and click OK to create the database.

The school database is created and is empty. So now first create the ‘Teacher’ table.

Click the ► sign given in front of School database name to open the various nodes inside it.

Next, right click on the Tables node and select Add New Table.

Table Design Window will open up in the Visual Studio. Here you can add the fields for the Teacher table.

In this window, inside the T-SQL tab, you can enter the below script to create the ‘Teacher’ table:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Teacher]
(
[Id] INT NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,
[Name] VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
[Skills] VARCHAR(250) NOT NULL,
[TotalStudents] INT NOT NULL,
[Salary] MONEY NOT NULL,
[AddedOn] DATE NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE()
)

Next, you click the Update button to start the creation process of this table, see the below image which explains this:

You will get a new dialog box called ‘Preview Database Updates’. Here click the ‘Update Database’ button and within a few seconds the Inventory table will be created.

You can find this newly created table inside the ‘Tables’ node.

The ‘Teacher’ table has 6 columns which are:

1. Id — a primary key column that will be auto-generated from 1 since it is provided with Identity(1,1) attribute.

2. Name — a varchar(50) column for storing the name of the teacher.

3. Skills — for storing the skills of the teacher.

4. TotalStudents — an Int column for storing the total number of students which a given teacher teaches.

5. Salary — for storing the salary of the teacher.

6. AddedOn — for storing the time of the creation of the record. The column has a Date type and is it automatically gets the current time using the GETDATE() SQL function.

Note that the columns have NOT NULL attribute so they cannot contain NULL in them.

Adding Connection String of the Database in the Application

A Connection String stores the parameters to the database and is used to connect the application to it. These parameters are the name of the driver, Server name and Database name. It also contains security information such as user name and password needed for the database connection.

The connection string is stored inside the appsettings.json file which resides in the root of the application.

Right click on the project name in the Solution Explorer and select Add > New Item. Then when the ‘Add New Item’ window opens up, select ASP.NET Configuration file file, and give it the name as appsettings.json (see below image). Finally click the ‘Add’ button.

The file will be created and open up for editing in Visual Studio. Add the below connection string to it:

{
"ConnectionStrings": {
"DefaultConnection": "Server= (localdb)\\MSSQLLocalDB;Database=School;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=true"
}
}

I defined trusted Connection as true in the connection string so the Windows credentials of the current user are used to authenticate against the SQL Server.

Adding Model class for Teacher

Right click on the project name in the Solutions Explorer and select ‘Add > New Folder’. Name this folder as ‘Models’. Then right click this ‘Models’ folder and select ‘Add > New Item’.

In the window that opens, select a new Class and name it teachers. Add the following properties to this class:

using CRUDADO.CustomValidation;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
namespace CRUDADO.Models
{
public class Teacher
{
[Required]
public int Id { get; set; }
        [Required]
public string Name { get; set; }
        [Required]
[SkillsValidate(Allowed = new string[] { "ASP.NET Core", "ASP.NET MVC", "ASP.NET Web Forms" }, ErrorMessage = "You skills are invalid")]
public string Skills { get; set; }
        [Range(5, 50)]
public int TotalStudents { get; set; }
        [Required]
public decimal Salary { get; set; }

[Required]
public DateTime AddedOn { get; set; }
}
}

This class has 6 properties for the 6 columns in the Teacher table in the database. I have applied the [Required] attributes on Id, Name, Skills, Salary and AddedOn properties, the TotalStudent property is applied with the [Range] attribute so it will only allow values from 5 to 50.

Also note the [SkillsValidate] attribute applied to the Skills property. The [SkillsValidate] attribute Is a custom validation attribute through which I will force Skills property to only accept 3 values which are:

1. ASP.NET Core

2. ASP.NET MVC

3. ASP.NET Web Forms

Next, I will create the [SkillsValidate] custom validation attribute. So create a new folder on the root of the application and name it as ‘CustomValidation’. Inside this folder add a new class called ‘SkillsValidate.cs’ and add the following code to it:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ModelBinding.Validation;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
namespace CRUDADO.CustomValidation
{
public class SkillsValidate : Attribute, IModelValidator
{
public string[] Allowed { get; set; }
public string ErrorMessage { get; set; }

public IEnumerable<ModelValidationResult> Validate(ModelValidationContext context)
{
if (Allowed.Contains(context.Model as string))
return Enumerable.Empty<ModelValidationResult>();
else
return new List<ModelValidationResult> {
new ModelValidationResult("", ErrorMessage)
};
}
}
}

Adding Client Side Validation feature

The Client Side validation feature is performed by ‘jQuery’ and 2 validation plugins which are:

1. jQuery Validation

2. jQuery Validation Unobtrusive

To install these 3 run the following commands in the ‘Package Manager Console’ window:

PM> Install-Package jQuery -Version 3.3.1
PM> Install-Package jQuery.Validation -Version 1.17.0
PM> Install-Package jQuery.Validation.Unobtrusive -Version 2.0.20710

Performing the CREATE Teacher Functionality

Create ‘Controllers’ folder on the root of the Application. Inside this folder add a new controller called ‘HomeController.cs’. The controller will have the initial code as shown below:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
namespace CRUDADO.Controllers
{
public class HomeController : Controller
{
public IActionResult Index()
{
return View();
}
}
}

The connection string is kept in appsettings.json file. To access this file I have to get the object of IConfiguration interface through Dependency Injection feature. Therefore I have to add the IConfiguration interface in the constructor of the HomeController and MVC framework will automatically provide me the object for it.

So change the Home Controller’s code to as shown below:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
namespace CRUDADO.Controllers
{
public class HomeController : Controller
{
public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }
public HomeController(IConfiguration configuration)
{
Configuration = configuration;
}

public IActionResult Index()
{
return View();
}
}
}

The CREATE Teacher Functionality is done through a new Action method called ‘CREATE’. So add the Create Action methods to the Home Controller as shown below:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using CRUDADO.Models;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
namespace CRUDADO.Controllers
{
public class HomeController : Controller
{
public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }
public HomeController(IConfiguration configuration)
{
Configuration = configuration;
}
        public IActionResult Index()
{
return View();
}
        public IActionResult Create()
{
return View();
}
        [HttpPost]
public IActionResult Create_Post(Teacher teacher)
{
if (ModelState.IsValid)
{
string connectionString = Configuration["ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection"];
using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
string sql = $"Insert Into Teacher (Name, Skills, TotalStudents, Salary) Values ('{teacher.Name}', '{teacher.Skills}','{teacher.TotalStudents}','{teacher.Salary}')";
                    using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection))
{
command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
connection.Open();
command.ExecuteNonQuery();
connection.Close();
}
return RedirectToAction("Index");
}
}
else
return View();
}
}
}

In the Create Action method I got the connection string in the below code line:

string connectionString = Configuration["ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection"];

Then I used the ‘SqlCommand’ object to insert the teacher’s records by running the insert SQL Query:

string sql = $"Insert Into Teacher (Name, Skills, TotalStudents, Salary) Values ('{teacher.Name}', '{teacher.Skills}','{teacher.TotalStudents}','{teacher.Salary}')";

Next, add the ‘Views’ folder in the root of the application. Inside this folder create a new folder called ‘Home’.

Next, create a new View called ‘Create.cshtml’ inside this ‘Home’ folder (i.e. ‘Views>Home’). Add the following code to this View:

@model Teacher
@{
Layout = "_Layout";
var title = "CREATE Teacher";
ViewData["Title"] = title;
}
<style>
.input-validation-error {
border-color: red;
}
</style>
<h2>@title</h2>
<div asp-validation-summary="ModelOnly" class="text-danger"></div>
<form class="m-1 p-1" method="post">
<div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="Name"></label>
<input asp-for="Name" class="form-control" />
<span asp-validation-for="Name" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
    <div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="Skills"></label>
<input asp-for="Skills" type="text" class="form-control" />
<span asp-validation-for="Skills" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
    <div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="TotalStudents"></label>
<input asp-for="TotalStudents" type="text" class="form-control" />
<span asp-validation-for="TotalStudents" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
    <div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="Salary"></label>
<input asp-for="Salary" type="text" class="form-control" />
<span asp-validation-for="Salary" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
<button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button></form>
<script src="/lib/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="/lib/jquery-validation/dist/jquery.validate.min.js"></script>
<script src="/lib/jquery-validation-unobtrusive/dist/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js"></script>

The View has a Model of type ‘Teacher’ and it creates Input fields for ‘Name, Skills, TotalStudents and Salary’, so that user can fill and submit it.

When the Submit button is clicked then the Create Action of type HttpPost, is called and the new teacher records is created.

Notice the 3 script files which do the Client Side Validation of the input fields in the View:

<script src="/lib/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="/lib/jquery-validation/dist/jquery.validate.min.js"></script>
<script src="/lib/jquery-validation-unobtrusive/dist/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js"></script>

Testing the Create Teacher functionality

Run the application and in the browser go to the URL of ‘Create’ View, which is — http://localhost:52730/Home/Create. You will see the Create Teacher form in the browser.

Without filling any fields press the Submit button and you will see the validation errors displayed by jQuery Validation plugins.

Now fill all the fields (as shown by the below image) and click the submit button.

The teacher record will be created in the database and you will be redirected to the Index View which is currently empty.

You can confirm the record is inserted in the Teacher’s table. For this go to the ‘SQL Server Object Explorer’, then right click the ‘Teacher’ table and select ‘View Data’.

The teacher table will open and you will see the new teacher record in it, see the below image:

Performing the READ Teacher Functionality

Now we will create the READ Teacher Functionality. So change the Index Action in the Home Controller to return all the teachers to the View as shown below:

public IActionResult Index()
{
List<Teacher> teacherList = new List<Teacher>();
string connectionString = Configuration["ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection"];
    using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
//SqlDataReader
connection.Open();

string sql = "Select * From Teacher";SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection);
using (SqlDataReader dataReader = command.ExecuteReader())
{
while (dataReader.Read())
{
Teacher teacher = new Teacher();
teacher.Id = Convert.ToInt32(dataReader["Id"]);
teacher.Name = Convert.ToString(dataReader["Name"]);
teacher.Skills = Convert.ToString(dataReader["Skills"]);
                teacher.TotalStudents = Convert.ToInt32(dataReader["TotalStudents"]);
teacher.Salary = Convert.ToDecimal(dataReader["Salary"]);
teacher.AddedOn = Convert.ToDateTime(dataReader["AddedOn"]);
                teacherList.Add(teacher);
}
}
connection.Close();
}
return View(teacherList);
}

In this action I execute the ‘Select * from Teacher’ query with the SqlCommand’s ExecuteReader() method to get an SqlDataReader object.

I then loop through all the records using SqlDataReader’s ‘.Read()’ method, and create a teacher list object which contains all the teacher’s records. This object is returned to the View as the Model in the very end of the code.

Next, add the ‘Index’ View inside the ‘Views/Home/’ folder with the following code:

@model IEnumerable<Teacher>
@{
Layout = "_Layout";
var title = "READ Teacher";
ViewData["Title"] = title;
}
<h2>@title</h2>
<h3><a asp-action="Create" class="btn btn-sm btn-secondary">Create</a></h3>
<table class="table table-bordered table-sm table-striped">
<thead>
<tr>
<th>Id</th>
<th>Name</th>
<th>Skills</th>
<th>Total Students</th>
<th>Salary</th>
<th>Added On</th>
<th>Update</th>
<th>Delete</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
@if (Model == null)
{
<tr>
<td colspan="7" class="text-center">No Model Data</td>
</tr>
}
else
{
@foreach (var p in Model)
{
<tr>
<td>@p.Id</td>
<td>@p.Name</td>
<td>@p.Skills</td>
<td>@p.TotalStudents</td>
<td>@string.Format(new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en-US"), "{0:C2}", p.Salary)</td>
<td>@string.Format("{0:dddd, dd MMMM yyyy}", p.AddedOn)</td>
<td><a asp-action="Update" asp-route-id="@p.Id">Update</a></td>
<td>
<form asp-action="Delete" method="post" asp-route-id="@p.Id">
<button>Delete</button>
</form>
</td>
</tr>
}
}
</tbody>
</table>

Notice that I have also created the columns for Update and Delete functionality in the table’s thead and tbody elements:

<table class="table table-bordered table-sm table-striped">
<thead>
<tr>
<th>Id</th>
<th>Name</th>
<th>Skills</th>
<th>Total Students</th>
<th>Salary</th>
<th>Added On</th>
<th>Update</th>
<th>Delete</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
    else
{
@foreach (var p in Model)
{
<tr>
                <td><a asp-action="Update" asp-route-id="@p.Id">Update</a></td>
<td>
<form asp-action="Delete" method="post" asp-route-id="@p.Id">
<button>Delete</button>
</form>
</td>
</tr>
}
}
</tbody>
</table>

We will create the Update and Delete Functionality in the next sections.

Testing the Read Teacher functionality

Run your application and you will see the Teacher’s table records get displayed in the Index View. This is shown by the below image:

Performing the UPDATE Teacher functionality

The Update functionality is done by adding Update Action methods to the Home Controller. The codes to add to the Controller are given below:

public IActionResult Update(int id)
{
string connectionString = Configuration["ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection"];
Teacher teacher = new Teacher();
    using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
string sql = $"Select * From Teacher Where Id='{id}'";
SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection);
connection.Open();
        using (SqlDataReader dataReader = command.ExecuteReader())
{
while (dataReader.Read())
{
teacher.Id = Convert.ToInt32(dataReader["Id"]);
teacher.Name = Convert.ToString(dataReader["Name"]);
teacher.Skills = Convert.ToString(dataReader["Skills"]);
                teacher.TotalStudents = Convert.ToInt32(dataReader["TotalStudents"]);
                teacher.Salary = Convert.ToDecimal(dataReader["Salary"]);
                teacher.AddedOn = Convert.ToDateTime(dataReader["AddedOn"]);
}
}
connection.Close();
}
return View(teacher);
}
[HttpPost]
[ActionName("Update")]
public IActionResult Update_Post(Teacher teacher)
{
string connectionString = Configuration["ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection"];
using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
string sql = $"Update Teacher SET Name='{teacher.Name}', Skills='{teacher.Skills}', TotalStudents='{teacher.TotalStudents}', Salary='{teacher.Salary}' Where Id='{teacher.Id}'";
        using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection))
{
connection.Open();
command.ExecuteNonQuery();
connection.Close();
}
}
return RedirectToAction("Index");
}

The HttpGet version of Update action method takes the ‘id’ of the teacher in it’s parameter and then runs the SQL Query called Select * From Teacher Where Id='{id}' with the SqlCommand object. It gets the teacher record’s value and returns it to the Update View.

The HttpPost version of Update Action method does the actual update of the teacher’s record using ADO.NET ‘SqlCommand’ object. The important thing to note is the update query which is:

string sql = $"Update Teacher SET Name='{teacher.Name}', Skills='{teacher.Skills}', TotalStudents='{teacher.TotalStudents}', Salary='{teacher.Salary}' Where Id='{teacher.Id}'";

Next, create the Update View inside the ‘Views/Home/’ folder with the following code:

@model Teacher
@{
Layout = "_Layout";
var title = "UPDATE Teacher";
ViewData["Title"] = title;
}
<style>
.input-validation-error {
border-color: red;
}
</style>
<h2>@title</h2>
<div asp-validation-summary="ModelOnly" class="text-danger"></div>
<form class="m-1 p-1" method="post">
<div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="Id"></label>
<input asp-for="Id" type="text" readonly class="form-control" />
</div
<div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="Name"></label>
<input asp-for="Name" type="text" class="form-control" />
<span asp-validation-for="Name" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="Skills"></label>
<input asp-for="Skills" type="text" class="form-control" />
<span asp-validation-for="Skills" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="TotalStudents"></label>
<input asp-for="TotalStudents" type="text" class="form-control" />
<span asp-validation-for="TotalStudents" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="Salary"></label>
<input asp-for="Salary" type="text" class="form-control"/>
<span asp-validation-for="Salary" class="text-danger"></span>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
<label asp-for="AddedOn"></label>
<input asp-for="AddedOn" type="text" class="form-control" asp-format="{0:d}" />
</div>
<button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
</form>
<script src="/lib/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="/lib/jquery-validation/dist/jquery.validate.min.js"></script><script src="/lib/jquery-validation-unobtrusive/dist/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js"></script>

The View is similar to the Index View we created earlier. I have made the ‘Id’ field as readonly so that user cannot change it.

Testing the Update Teacher functionality

Run your application and click the ‘Update’ link for the 1st teacher records, see below image:

The record will open for updation. Change name to ‘Bill Gates’ and salary to ‘100000000’. Finally click the submit button as shown by the below image:

Record will be updated and you will be redirected to the Index View where you can see the updated record fields as shown by the below image:

Performing the DELETE Teacher Functionality

Create Delete Action method in the Home Controller whose code is given below:

HttpPost]
public IActionResult Delete(int id)
{
string connectionString = Configuration["ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection"]
using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
string sql = $"Delete From Teacher Where Id='{id}'";
using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection))
{
connection.Open();
try
{
command.ExecuteNonQuery();
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
ViewBag.Result = "Operation got error:" + ex.Message;
}
connection.Close();
}
}
return RedirectToAction("Index");
}

This method takes the id of the teacher’s record in it’s parameter and then execute the Delete SQL query:

string sql = $"Delete From Teacher Where Id='{id}'";

Testing the Delete Teacher functionality

Run your application and click the ‘Delete’ link given against any of the record. Check the below images which shows the record deletion process:

Windows ASP.NET Hosting Comparison - ASPHostPortal.com VS Webfusion VS HostMySite

Laravel vs WordPress: Speed, Performance, and SEO

Laravel vs WordPress: Speed, Performance, and SEO – Which is Better For Your Web Development?

Are You Wondering does WordPress use Laravel?, What is the difference between WordPress and PHP?, Is WordPress a PHP framework?, What PHP framework does WordPress Use?, Is Laravel a CMS? 

Laravel is a PHP Web framework and an open source framework which was created and developed by Taylor Otwell. It was initially released in 2011. It is written in PHP 7 and supports the cross-platform operating system. It is mainly developed for the development of web applications that are based on the model view controller (MVC) architecture and symphony.

WordPress is an open source content management system (CMS) which was developed by the WordPress Foundation. It is written in PHP and was initially released in 2003. It has features like plugin architecture and template system.

Key Differences between Laravel vs WordPress

Both the Laravel vs WordPress platform are recommended to any business. Let us examine some of the key difference between Laravel vs WordPress:

Code Developed

In Laravel, the developed codes are well organized. When the code grows, Laravel takes care of How to reuse the existing code and solves the problem automatically to a greater extent. While In WordPress, all the content needs to be maintained by the developer and in a particular way that when code grows it will be simple to understand.

In Laravel framework developer needs to understand the code. While in WordPress, it is really easy to start building the website by selecting any particular theme.

In the Laravel framework, there is a great learning curve, which means it requires to be understood. While In WordPress, it is having less learning curve. By using a theme anyone can write any content and publish it for free and quickly.

Features

Laravel has a lot of features like authentication, authorization, inversion of control, etc. It is also getting better and better with its new releases. While In WordPress, authentication has been taken care of by using available plugins.

SEO

In Laravel, SEO needs to define its own routes and also it takes a lot of work to develop a website which relies mainly on content. While In WordPress, SEO can be done more efficiently by using plugins which help to reduce lots of effort and time to perform SEO for any websites.

Database

In Laravel database can be used or designed in your own way. While in WordPress, the database is mostly not required as it remains the static data mostly.

Community

Compare to Laravel WordPress has a large community of developers to support and guide.

Laravel framework is less flexible to update and change any content while WordPress is more flexible to edit and update any content at any point in time.

Performance comparison between Laravel vs WordPress:

Laravel framework is really quick and fast. It is referred to as an improved and better platform. Laravel use Eloquent for writing the database queries which make the task easier. If it not used, Laravel becomes slower.

WordPress sometimes becomes slow because of the use of plugins. Take note that if anyone is using the better plugins or strongly coded plugins than a performance of WordPress is also better and quite fast.

Conclusion: Laravel vs WordPress

Laravel and WordPress both platforms are quite different as Laravel is framework whereas WordPress is Content management system. To use Laravel developer need to know the object-oriented programming to write any code and develop the web application. Both Laravel and WordPress is used for different purposes. Laravel and WordPress are having own pros and cons. But both are really commendable in their expertise and usages. So, the selection of any technology will always be done on the base of the future vision of any project.

Cheap and Reliable WordPress 4.5 Hosting

What Joomla is Capable of?

While considering the content management system (CMS) for your site, you want to choose something convenient and simple. And the Web-hosting on Joomla immediately comes to your mind.

Why not? It is really a very simple system. It is written in PHP and JavaScript, that are the most simple to understand programming languages. This means that the hosting on Joomla will be easy to install and configure. MySQL, the well-known DBMS, is used as the default storage.

What Joomla is capable of?

The first version was released back in 2005, and according to the statistics, Joomla was downloaded and installed over 94 million times! This figure indicates the huge popularity of CMS. There is a community of thousands of developers behind it, the system is actively developing. Joomla is one of the most popular CMS, existing today. It is free and chargeless software.

Taking into account the number of alterations in each new version of Joomla, it becomes immediately clear how rapidly CMS is developing. For example, the main innovation in version 3.8 was an improved routing system, in other words, nice and laconic URLs for the entire structure of the site. In addition, the support for the Sodium extension for the encryption has been implemented. It is also supported in PHP 7.2. In addition, the layer of the compatibility with the future version of Joomla 4 was added.

The Joomla hosting of the websites supports almost any hoster, so choosing a site for placement will not be a problem. Apache, Nginx are also supported. There is even the support for Microsoft IIS.

Creating sites in Joomla

Joomla was originally designed as an easy-to-use system, so that the development of websites was accessible even to a non-professional user who had never done anything like that before. On many hostings Joomla installation is performed by a simple click of a mouse or there are automatic installers. In other words, you can launch your website within just a few minutes.

This type of CMS is very convenient for developing sites not only for the personal use, but also for the commercial development. If you are a web designer or a developer, then you can fulfill customers’ orders quickly by using Joomla. And then they will be able to run their own sites easily.

Only in the official Joomla Extensions Directory there are more than 8,000 free and commercial extensions for this system, and there are even more in other sources. This means that on the Joomla hosting of the websites you can create almost any kind of website: from a personal blog to a corporate portal or an online shop. Most of the presented extensions are distributed under the free license GPL and they are completely chargeless.

Advanced developers will also like Joomla, because it allows the development and the simple adding of exclusive extensions, the possibilities of which are beyond the limits of the standard package. Are you looking for your own unique inventory management systems, reporting tools, modules for ensuring the joint operation of various kinds of software? Maybe a specific product catalog, an integrated e-commerce system, sophisticated business directories, booking systems or communication tools? All these modules are designed in PHP and MySQL. And even if the catalog does not have a suitable extension, its development will not become an impassable problem.

First website on Joomla

You can launch your first website on Joomla at the free demo hosting launch.joomla.org. Just think up your unique address in the domain * .joomla.com.

Having entered and confirmed the email address, you set a password for the access to the cloud control panel (CCP). The virtual server automatically sets up, the database configures and the Joomla CMS installs. Then, using the templates, you choose the look and the layout for the site. The templates are used as a framework for combining different elements of the site, such as articles, elements, menus / navigation, modules and extensions.

But, of course, the resource on * .joomla.com is just a free Joomla hosting of the websites for learning the basics and the examination of the system. For the permanent operation you need a normal hosting. How to choose a hosting? It depends on the characteristics of the hoster. The best hosting of the websites on Joomla is the one that provides the best prices and service, maximum uptime and minimum ping for your users.

Transfer of the Joomla website to another hoster

The migration to another hoster is a procedure in several stages, which are properly described in the official documentation and in the support forums.

To make a long story short, the essence is as follows:

  • Copy the files to the computer including the dump of the database.
  • Install Joomla on the new server.
  • Import the dump into a new database.
  • Overwrite all the important Joomla folders on the new server, in other words, copy the structure of the site.
  • Check that everything is alright and change the configuration.php file in the root directory accordingly. Thanks to this file, we can easily move from one virtual Joomla hosting of the websites to another.
Cheap Drupal 8.0.5 Hosting Recommendation

How To Enable GZIP Compression In WordPress?

How Does WordPress GZIP Compression Work?

A mashup of computer languages—HTML, CSS, and JavaScript—are used by almost all modern websites. Reducing them to their most basic form, they’re essentially text files.

When users go to your website, their browsers download these text files and will begin rendering the website according to the code contained within these files. These codes are then translated to something readable and understandable to the average human.

As machines, browsers don’t require all that extra whitespace and extra formatting used to improve readability. As long as the browser can analyze code content, it can be written in one long block of text.

In general, WordPress GZIP compression takes away the formatting that is mainly used for human understanding. Reducing the length of code also reduces the size of the file containing it.

How to Enable WordPress GZIP Compression

WordPress GZIP compression is actually something that you need to enable on the server side—not WordPress.

For other web hosts, it’s up to you to enable WordPress GZIP compression.

Based on the plugins you’re already using (or the web host where your website is stored), it’s possible that WordPress GZIP compression is already enabled. You can easily check to determine this by running your domain name through the GZIP compression checker.

If you’ve determined that WordPress GZIP compression is not yet enabled, there are multiple methods to get started—with different options for experienced backend web development and newbie WordPress users, alike.

1.     Enabling WordPress GZIP Compression via .htaccess

This is the most common way to enable WordPress GZIP compression.

However, this particular method involves the possibility that you might break something. After all, .htaccess is a very sensitive server file, and one wrong move can mess up your whole website.

To reduce the likelihood of breaking your WordPress website, be sure to make a copy of the original file before making any changes. And back up your WordPress website!

Once you’ve covered all your bases, it’s time to get rolling.

The .htaccess file should be in the root folder of your website. This file, however, is usually hidden by default on both the remote server and your own machine, if you copy it.

The best way is to access the file is through FTP. Alternatively, you can use another admin interface or cPanel.

To enable WordPress GZIP compression in your FTP client, force hidden files to show.

Once you locate the .htaccess file, start editing it. Or, to be safe, download the file on your computer and first make changes on your own hard drive. The file is likely also hidden by default on your own machine, so force hidden files to show.

Add the following code, sourced from GTmetrix, either inside or outside # BEGIN WordPress and # END WordPress (it doesn’t matter where):

# Compress HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Text, XML and fonts
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/javascript
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/rss+xml
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/vnd.ms-fontobject
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/x-font
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/x-font-opentype
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/x-font-otf
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/x-font-truetype
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/x-font-ttf
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/x-javascript
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/xhtml+xml
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/xml
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE font/opentype
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE font/otf
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE font/ttf
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE image/svg+xml
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE image/x-icon
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/css
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/html
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/javascript
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/plain
AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/xml


# Remove browser bugs (only needed for really old browsers)
BrowserMatch ^Mozilla/4 gzip-only-text/html
BrowserMatch ^Mozilla/4\.0[678] no-gzip
BrowserMatch \bMSIE !no-gzip !gzip-only-text/html
Header append Vary User-Agent

Save the file and replace your original .htaccess file. Then, run your website through the aforementioned GZIP Compression checker tool to make sure that you were successful.

2. Contact Your Web Host

If you’re not comfortable making changes to your website files, it’ll be easier to ask your web host to enable WordPress GZIP compression for you.

In general, most web hosts will be willing to assist you with this query when you reach out to their customer support teams.

3. Enable WordPress GZIP Compression with a Plugin

Of course, if you’re using WordPress, there’s always a plugin that can make the job easier. The caveat? More plugins means more potential security vulnerabilities—and space on your server.

Regardless, these plugins can help you to easily enable WordPress GZIP compression.

WP ROCKET

WP Rocket is a caching plugin that helps WordPress sites load faster in just few clicks. Upon activation, WP Rocket adds GZIP compression rules in your .htaccess file using the mod_deflate module.

CHECK AND ENABLE GZIP COMPRESSION

Just as the name “Check and Enable GZIP Compression” suggests, this plugin is built for that same purpose. It’s simple: the plugin checks if your WordPress site has GZIP compression enabled and it will enable GZIP compression if it’s not yet done. This plugin has over 20,000 active users.

W3 TOTAL CACHE

W3 Total Cache is considered to be the number one WordPress caching plugin. A potential issue: WordPress newbies can easily break their website when using W3 Total Cache without proper configuration. If you know what you’re doing, you can also enable HTTP compression by going to the browser cache, and checking the box for HTTP (GZIP) compression.

WP SUPER CACHE

WP Super Cache is another WordPress cache plugin that offers the option to compress code. To enable WordPress GZIP compression using WP Super Cache, go to the WordPress dashboard > WP Super Cache > Advanced > check the box for Compress pages so they’re served more quickly to visitors.

4. Enable GZIP on NGINX

If you’re running on NGINX, look for your nginx.conf file and add the following code:

gzip on;
gzip_disable "MSIE [1-6]\.(?!.*SV1)";
gzip_vary on;
gzip_types text/plain text/css text/javascript image/svg+xml image/x-icon application/javascript application/x-javascript;

Final Thoughts: Everything You Need to Know About WordPress GZIP Compression

While there are plenty of ways to improve your WordPress site’s speed and page load time, GZIP compression is one of the easiest ways to do it.

Don’t wait for slow page load times to affect your businesses bottom line. Check your website to determine if WordPress GZIP compression is enabled. If it isn’t, you have plenty of tools at your disposal to turn the tides in your favor.

Once you’re done with WordPress GZIP compression, there are still several additional tactics you can employ for improving page speed. Educate yourself and take advantage of the available options—like image optimization plugins or using a CDN.

Best ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting Recommendation

Why Choose SSD Web Hosting?

There are several reasons that website owners are choosing SSD hosting, with speed being the biggest motive. Solid State Drive hosting, or SSD, is the best choice for websites with high traffic volumes. In addition to speed, this technology can also improve your website’s uptime and overall performance.

According to recent market research, just a single second delay in the time it takes to load a webpage dramatically impacts visitor engagement with your site. It results in 7% fewer conversions, a whopping 16% reduction in visitor satisfaction ratings and 11% less page views.

Here is a look at how SSD web hosting can have make a definite improvement in your webpage’s speed and your visitor’s positive response.

What Is SSD?

Solid State Drivesare the new kid on the block when it comes to web storage. They have no moving parts, hence the name solid state. There are no mechanical parts to break down, like spinning disks or read-write arms.

When first introduced, they were very expensive. The technology has advanced enough to make them affordable for most web hosts. They are now commonly found in packages for shared hostingvirtual private serversand dedicated servers. The latest laptops, tablets and desktops use them too.

3 Big Advantages of SSD Web Hosting

SSD is reliable, fast and eco-friendly, all-important factors when choosing a web host. The less webmasters need to worry about the nuts and bolts of their webpages, the more time they can spend on content, marketing and engaging with readers.

Here’s a rundown on each advantage.

Reliable

With no moving parts, there is little chance of a breakdown and nothing to wear out. Traditional drives can also have long life spans, but are definitely more prone to problems. Over time, SSDs are more efficient and dependable.

An SSD is less vulnerable to shock and vibration, a constant problem for older drives. Since it runs cooler, it can handle a wide range of temperatures in its environment.

As an example of their reliability, an SSD can handle having the entire volume of its drive to be written to every single day for 10 full years without showing wear. Unlike a traditional drive, an SSD doesn’t simply die at the end of its lifespan, resulting in data loss. Instead it simply stops allowing more write access, which saves data and stress for blog owners. The content is still accessible, even after the drive is no longer usable.

Fast

Speed is essential if you want to attract and keep readers and potential customers to your website. Overall, the loading time for SSDs is considered to be about 10 times faster.

Why is this so important to a webmaster?

Consider what happens when a visitor comes to your website. His actions trigger database queries and access to content. With an SSD, data can be read and written at the same time, saving time for your visitor. With a traditional server, access is regulated by mechanical factors. The mechanical arm on the rotating disks must move in response to each request by the visitor, all of which takes time.

If your website is combined with e-commerce, the result of using traditional servers is fewer sales. Potential customers want the transaction to take place quickly. Abandoned carts are the bane of online marketers.

Websites with high-caching notice immediate benefits when switching to SSDs. Caching is a tool for speed and means that the servers store copies of the site on hard drives so they can be served quickly for the user. SSDs read/write faster so the benefits of caching are even greater.

Eco-friendly

Since SSDs use less power, they are more energy efficient than traditional drives. They don’t spin and they run cooler, both of which help with power consumption. The combination of better performance and environmentally friendly is a hard one to argue with.

Each SSD uses close to 80% less energy per gigabyte than a traditional drive. When you consider how many servers there are in a big data center, the environmental impact is significant.

How Much Does It Cost?

As a rule, SSD plansare now about the same price as traditional hosting plans. In some cases, the plan allows slightly less storage, but this is usually not a factor for most website owners. Even if you have a lot of data on your site, the smaller storage allotment is offset by the gains in performance and reliability.

Who Is It For?

Anyone with a website can benefit from faster load times and reliability. And most people are happy to go green if given the chance. That said, there are five specific categories of web hosting users that will most definitely benefit from SSD hosting.

• Websites using WordPress, Drupal and other types of content management systems: information retrieval is much faster

• e-commerce sites: the faster loading time increases sales

• High-traffic websites: SSD responds to visitor requests faster, resulting in higher visitor satisfaction and conversions

• High-caching websites: since reading/writing is faster, visitors experience faster speeds

• SEO-optimized websites: fast response and SEO go together in visitor satisfaction. Optimizing for speed as well as for search engines is essential.


What is Domain? (Domain Facts)

What Is a Domain Name?

It is very easy to define a domain name: a string of characters that represent one or multiple IP addresses. See? Easy.

The question is, what do you understand from this domain name definition?

Giving an understandable explanation takes a bit more effort and careful wording. The swamp of technical terminology is alluring but not always beneficial.

Let’s try again.

Domain name is what you type in the address bar of your browser when you want to access a specific web page.

HostingCheapASP.NET.

Or Google.com.

These are two domain names.

Mind, these are registered domain names, but they are not the sites HostingCheapASP.NET or Google. By definition, a domain name is the address onto which a website resides.

I know it sounds confusing, but the mucky part is easy to grasp with an analogy from the real world. This analogy is as old as the first domain name Symbolics.com, which was registered over three decades ago.

Anyway, moving on.

What’s the difference between a domain and a website?

Domain name is like the physical address of a street, say, 5 Lincoln Street.

What resides on this address is (a web page in the digital world) a building. This building could be an old Victorian house with an intricate design for several decades before being demolished and turned into a fancy co-work space where lumbersexual hipsters drink copious amounts of coffee and while trying to find meaning to their existence.

The point is that it doesn’t matter what kind of building resides on 5 Lincoln Street; the address itself doesn’t change.

Are you still with me?

It is the same with domain names. They are the location, the digital property onto which something meaningful or obscene is created: a website.

That’s why saying that our site is HostingCheapASP.NET is technically incorrect. This is our domain name. Our site is comprised of the articles, graphics, case studies, technical pages, comment section, and contact form.

Neat division, if you ask me, and a very real one.

A domain name can totally exist without a website on it, and a website can sort of exist without a domain name.

Now that you have gained some free domain knowledge, check out the infographic to see the importance of a catchy URL and how the domain name system came to be.

Is the Domain Name the Same as the IP Address of a Website?

You might be wondering whether IP addresses and domain names are the same thing.

No, they aren’t.

That’s the whole point of having domain names. They were invented to replace IP addresses for day-to-day human activities.

See, IP addresses are essential for the global network to function. Without them, chaos would reign supreme, and no meaningful communication between multiple independent networks would be possible.

IP addresses are the way machines know each other and who they communicate with.

If we, humans, could remember four sets of one-to-three digits separated by dots, then we wouldn’t need domain names at all. Only that we can’t

Even without a domain name system definition, you can figure out that it makes the domain names function. It does a bunch of other crucial things, but one of its core services is to translate domain names to specific IP addresses.

You might have heard the analogy between the DNS and a phone book if you are old enough to know what the latter means. Domain names are equivalent to human names, while the IP addresses are the phone numbers assigned to each domain.

Of course, being what it is, the DNS can change the records easily, mapping one domain to a new IP address without much effort.

For our current needs, this basic DNS definition should suffice. We have a dedicated resource here on the HostingCheapASP.NET that explains how it works in depth, what is a domain name server, how a domain name is mapped to a certain IP address, and so forth.

Domain Name Anatomy

Domain names are read from right to left. That’s why the last thing you type, be that dot-com, dot-net, dot-us or dot-whatever, is called top-level domain or TLD, for brevity.

What you type before this dot is the actual domain. In our case,
HostingCheapASP.NET consists of the domain (HostingCheapASP) and the TLD dot-net.

By definition, domain names and the entire DNS function in a strict, logical hierarchy. The order of begins with the top-level domains, then actual domains, then anything else.

Because the actual domain may be preceded by the WWW prefix or something else to create a fully qualified domain (FQDN). It could be
www.HostingCheapASP.NET or Mail.HostingCheapASP.NET .

Whatever the case may be, the part to the left separated with a dot from the main domain is called sub-domain, as it is hierarchically inferior to the main domain. It belongs to it, forming its own (smaller) domain within the actual domain name.

Confused yet?

Do you want me to tell you about HTTP and HTTPS that you see in the address bar of your browser?

Relax, I won’t go full-nerd there.

HTTP(S) is not a part of the domain name. Instead, it is the protocol, the language in which computer networks communicate. HTTP(S) stands for hypertext transfer protocol (secure).

Pretty much nothing to do with domain names.

Domain Registration and Lifecycle

The first step to secure the web address you wish starts with a domain name search. Practically all companies that register domains have a domain search field. You can use it to check what is free and what is available.

However, one quite confusing thing for first-timers is the fact that you cannot buy a domain name for good. Instead, domains are registered by public or private entities for some time. They can be renewed before the end of their registration period or left to expire if no longer needed.

The logic behind this arrangement is to allow newcomers to the global network to get the domains they want. Theoretically, it should work because once the registration time expires, the same domain name becomes available for anyone to purchase and register anew.

Only that it is not quite that simple.

Domain Name Registration

Normally, the shortest time for domain registration is one year, while the maximum period is 10. There are exceptions, and certain domain registrars offer premium services that ensure a domain is registered for a longer period, but none can be taken for less than 12 months.

In other words, once a domain is registered, it cannot be unregistered or changed. You have to be very careful when typing in the domain name you wish to have; check the spelling two and even three times to make sure it is exactly what you want.

Registering a domain is one of the most immutable pieces of digital data in existence and for a good reason.

Now, certain domain registrars could try to revoke the domain registration within the first five days of its creation, but it is best to not resort to last-ditch efforts to fix an erroneously spelled name.

Once you have the domain under your control, it would be able to host a website and serve emails for as long as you keep on renewing it. The domain registrar, i.e., the company through which you have purchased the domain, is legally obliged to send you email reminders when the domain expiration approaches so that you can decide on time whether to renew or not.

For as long as you renew it, the domain will be serving you.

Domain Expiry

In case you don’t renew, though, things become interesting.

On the expiry date, most TLDs enter a grace period that lasts about a month. During the grace period they cease to function. Any websites associated with them become inaccessible, and so do all mailboxes.

All the same, during the grace period the owner – or domain registrant, as is the right name – can renew the domain for the regular renewal fee. If renewed, the domain should return to normal function within 24 hours.

Typically, the grace period lasts 30 days. Some domain guides state “up to 45 days”, but that’s not in the ICANN rules. While occasionally the grace period might be extended for technical reasons, relying on that is simply foolish.

30 days at most.

Some domains, most notably dot-EU, do not have a grace period at all.

Redemption Period and Deletion

Once the grace period is over (if existent in the first place), the domain enters the ominously named redemption period. During this time the domain is in the hands of the registrar and is no longer owned by the initial registrant.

The redemption period typically stretches another 30 days. The owner could request the domain to be restored, buuuuuuuuuut (it is a big one, indeed) there are two caveats:

  • The redemption fee is significantly higher than the renewal fee; often, it exceeds $100.
  • The registrar (actually, the registry but let’s not go there) is legally allowed to keep the domain; even if a restoration request has been filed and a redemption fee paid, the registrar could keep the domain.

In other words, don’t let your domain enter redemption. Ever.

Once the redemption period is over, the domain name enters deletion. It lasts five days or so. Once over, the domain is officially erased from all records and becomes non-existent.

What that means in practice is that the domain can be registered anew by anyone with internet connection and a credit card.

Domain Hacks – How to Get a Domain Name Back

If your domain name enters redemption and you don’t want to pay the hefty restoration fee, you could wait for the domain to be deleted. Then you could purchase it for the regular registration fee, typically slightly over $10.

The risk here is that the moment the domain appears free, someone else might snatch it. A competitor who wishes you out of the game, a complete stranger who likes the name, a domain name trader who registers domains and resells them for profit, and so forth.

It is a risky move, but it could save you some expenses, potentially.

So, in a nutshell, in case you haven’t seen our neat infographic, the life of a domain name passes through these stages:

  • Available for registration – Practically, the domain doesn’t exist yet
  • Registration – A person or business purchases it for a set period of time
  • Active period – The domain functions for as long as the registration is valid
  • Grace period – Kicks in on the last day of the active period, lasts 30 days
  • Redemption period – Starts once the grace period is over, lasts 30 days
  • Deletion period – Lasts five days and follows the redemption period; the domain is irretrievable
  • Available for registration – The cycle is completed

Again, certain TLDs don’t have a grace period, while others don’t have a redemption period. Some don’t have either. Such domains are listed for deletion upon expiry.

Always check with the domain specialists of your registrar for any funky rules before you purchase a domain name.

Domain Name Registration Process

During the registration process, you must fill in something known as WHOIS information. Essentially, this data identifies who rightfully owns a domain name.

There are four WHOIS sections. They are known as registrant, billing, technical, and administrative contacts and are identical. Each asks for a name, physical address, telephone, and an email address.

While all fields should be filled in accurately, the email address is the most important by a long shot. More precisely, the email address you put in the administrative section matters the most, together with the one in the registrant field.

The administrative email is important for proving who owns the domain name, in case of an ownership dispute. It is also the one through which domain name transfers happen.

Practically, up until 2013, the administrative email address was the only significant one.

Since then, ICANN requires that upon registration domain registrars send confirmation emails to the registrant email address.

In other words, if you input the wrong email address when registering a domain, you will never receive the confirmation email and your new web address will be deactivated.

Make sure to check the spam folder of your registrant email address not to miss the confirmation link.

Free Domain Name Registration

Many hosting providers attract new customers with initial lower hosting fees, but they also throw in the mix a domain name.

It is a nice thing to get a free domain registration, but keep in mind that this offer typically covers a single year. After that, you will have to pay for the domain renewal.

All the same, a free service never hurts.

Domain Transfers

Domain names can be transferred between registrars and between owners. The latter happens much more easily, but it is the former that is normally termed “domain transfer”.

Change of Domain Ownership

For ownership to change, technically, all you need to do is to edit the WHOIS information. Input the name of the new owner and his or her valid email address in the registrant and administrative sections, and that’s it.

Admittedly, that’s a rather narrow definition of domain name ownership transfer. To relinquish control to the new owner completely, she or he must be given access to the control panel of the domain registrar as well.

In case you have many domain names and wish to give away only one of them, a domain transfer might be in order.

Transfer Domains Between Registrars

Domains are transferred for different reasons. Users grow dissatisfied with the registrar company or find a better deal; the hosting service migrates to a new hosting provider, and the domain name follows; a new owner comes in town, and so forth.

Now, a domain can be transferred but only if it is older than 60 days (i.e. two months have passed since its initial registration) and if the receiving registrar can accept it. Not all registrars are authorized to handle all TLDs.

In case the domain name is eligible for transfer, you have to do three things.

Well, four, actually.

First and foremost, make sure you have access to the administrative email associated with the domain. You will need it.

Then go to the current registrar and unlock the domain. By default, domain names are locked to prevent unwanted transfers.

Once the domain is unlocked, ask the registrar to give you the authorization or EPP code. It is a combination of digits and letters unique to your domain that serves to confirm the transfer request.

Without it, no domain can be moved.

Lastly, go to the company you wish to move the domain to and ask them to initiate the transfer. They will send a transfer request to the current company and will need the EPP code to start it.

Once the transfer begins, you must check the administrative email every now and again because you will receive a confirmation request. Typically, it is an email with a link that you need to click to confirm that this is a legit transfer request that you, the rightful owner, wish to happen.

Should you fail to confirm the transfer, it will stop, and the domain name will stay with the current registrar.

Capisce?

Are Domain Transfers Free?

Normally, the gaining registrar would charge you a registration fee for the transfer. This fee will be applied toward renewing the domain for one more year.

I guess, in a sense, this makes the transfer free.

Some hosting providers offer free domain names to new customers, but this offer rarely extends for inbound transfers. Still, it is always worth checking with the sales team to make sure you can’t benefit.

Beware of registrars that charge for providing the authorization code. These are cheap tactics to dissuade people from transferring their domains away.

You can dispute this as you are the rightful registrant and the EPP code belongs to you and are entitled to get it free of charge upon request.

What Is the Best Place to Buy Domain Names?

There are many registrars nowadays. Most website hosting providers can register domain names too.

There is an argument to be had about keeping your domain name where your web hosting services are, but there is one against it, too.

If you have one or two domains and like a particular host, you can easily keep everything in one place, for easier management.

On the other hand, if you have many websites, it is best to have a dedicated domain name registrar.

If you are looking for a deal, buy a domain at Namecheap or GoDaddy. These are two of the largest registrars. And while I have reserves about GoDaddy’s hosting service, their domain registration deals are quite OK.

So, What Is a Domain Name, eh?

If you’ve read the awesome infographic and the entire article up to this point, you already know more about domain names than 95% of the people.

If you have done neither and just came to the bottom to see what wisdom it may contain, I must say that I am a bit disappointed, but… I got you covered, fam.

To have a smoothly running operation online, make sure to register the domain name you wish to use with an email address you actively use. List said email under the registrant and administrative contacts, and you will never lose the domain of yours.

That’s by far the best advice I can give you when it comes to domain management and ownership.

Register with a valid, frequently used an email address, and add the registrar’s email address in your address book or else incoming notifications might end up in the spam folder.

That’s about it.

Happy hosting!

FAQ

Q: Are domain names free?

A: Generally, no, they aren’t. However, many web hosting providers allow a free domain registration to their new customers. Funnily enough, domain names used to be free until 1995, but this is no longer the case. Currently, popular TLDs like dot-com, dot-net, dot-org cost about $10 per year.

Q: What is the highest price ever paid for a domain name?

A: LasVegas.com was acquired for $90 million. No joke. Back in 2005, the marketing value of this domain name commanded a price that is yet to be surpassed. The closest rivals in this category are incredibly expensive as well but are very far behind: CarInsurance.con was acquired for $49.7 million, while Insurance.com cost $35.6 million. Both changed hands in 2010.

Q: What is a computer domain?

A: First of all, a computer domain is not a domain name for website hosting. It is a type of computer network comprised of Windows devices. Windows domain usually contains various user accounts and physical devices that have various levels of access to the network and are controlled by a central (set of) controller(s). Let’s leave it at that.

Q: What is a fully qualified domain name?

A: A fully qualified domain name (FQDN) is the complete domain name of a host or a computer. The same way a regular domain is composed of the TLD (.net) and the actual name (HostingCheapASP.NET ), an FQDN adds a hostname to the mix. It could be WWW for the global network or something else, like “mail” or “ftp.” FTP.HostingCheapASP.NET is an FQDN, as it specifies completely what is to be accessed.

Q: What is a domain name system?

A: DNS is the thing that makes the world go round. No joke. Without a functioning domain name system, the global network would come to a halt. It is a hierarchical system that is decentralized, delegating functional authority to various authoritative name servers. Most importantly, the DNS maintains a vast database that maps all existing domain names to their respective IP addresses.

Q: What is a domain name and how does it work?

A: A domain name is the address of a website. Every domain is associated with a specific IP address or addresses to display the proper web page. To learn more, scroll up and start from the top!

Cheap Umbraco 7.4.1 Hosting Recommendation

How to Choose the Right Content Management System?

With a vast array of CMS vendors and products on the market, selecting the right CMS can seem like a daunting task. Over the last decade, our team has seen the negative impact of making the wrong choice far too many times – consequences that can haunt your business and its IT department for years. This post is intended to provide a methodology to help get this crucial decision right.

In reality, there is no perfect CMS and no solution to suit all possible situations. Moreover, choosing and implementing a content management system is only the beginning of a journey that can pay dividends – or cost you dearly – down the road. Purchasing a CMS that requires excessive oversight and support, significantly impairs the ability for teams to manage content, and ultimately, leads to an undesirable website experience. The problem compounds for organizations that operate multiple sites and other digital properties. It’s a paradox that a system intended to enable your team and website can also be an enormous setback.

The first mistake many people and organizations make when choosing a content management system is that they overlook the long-term cost of an inexpensive solution, underestimate the amount of work it takes to manage a good content management system, and forget to align their team’s needs with the CMS’s capabilities.

Tips on Content Management CMS

To choose a CMS that’s right for your team – and to avoid from making this mistake, follow these 10 tips below:

Don’t Build Custom/in-house Content Management Software

It is very enticing to believe that your team can build a custom CMS, including open source. However, we have never seen it work. No matter how much you plan for it, your team does not have the years of experience that lends a capable hand to handle many complexities that come with a CMS. The amount of developer support required in the long-term outweighs the cost of purchasing a CMS; and not to mention, custom builds are prone-to-fail.

Avoid Heavy Developer Reliance

That is a recipe for disaster. Your development speed should not dictate your business moves. Make sure your content management solution enables your teams to focus on implementing campaigns and strategies that increase web traffic instead of spending excessive amounts of time on managing the technology.

Make Sure Your CMS is Scalable

Scalability should come as a no-brainer. Change is inevitable for any growing business, and changes impact your websites. Make sure you choose a CMS solution that can quickly grow and scale as-needed.

Choose An CMS that Supports Omnichannel

Even if your business is currently only leveraging desktop or mobile sites, it’s important to consider other properties that you haven’t, yet, looked into, but could benefit from in the future. Currently, content exists in the form of AR/VR, mobile, kiosks, digital assistants, jumbotrons, and so on, and there is no sign of this slowing down in the future. Make sure you choose a CMS solution that is capable of supporting new channels when you’re ready.

Don’t Limit Your System to One Code

No matter how great a content management system is, if there are no proper programmers available, it will fail. Many traditional CMS headaches stem from needing to hire resources that are highly specialized/skilled in a specific CMS infrastructure – this can be very limiting and create bottlenecks. Go for a system that allows your developers to utilize his strength and code in his preferred programming language.

Support is More Important than Software

A system could be everything you need, but if the platform team is not available to help you when you need help the most, it spells disaster for everyone. Finding a content management system that allows developers to work without disrupting the creation and management of content is sure to save your business time and money.

Be Sure to Test and Get A Proof-of-concept First

Before you roll out the CMS for your entire site, make sure to test the CMS and get a proof-of-concept. Implement a section of the website first and get team members and end-users to check everything from creating and authoring pages to establishing a workflow process. Testing mitigates many issues that may not have been apparent and saves you a lot of time and money.

Choose An UI That is Intuitive

Having a user-friendly interface is especially important if you have a team that won’t be living in the system every day. They’ll need a solution that is easy-to-use, not require a lot of technical know-how or training, and can quickly pick it up when they log back in.

Make Sure The CMS Has APIs and Supports Integrations with Other Apps and Microservices

Whether you want to incorporate personalization to your marketing strategy or want to get deep insights into your users’ web interactions and behaviors, businesses, like Partners and Marketing, require very different apps and microservices to manage their day-to-day work on the website. Marketing demands a solution that can easily integrate with marketing automation tool, business intelligence tool, Google Analytics, and RSS to deliver personalized content. Partners need to connect with devices like partner management platform, such as NetSuite, to better manage partner alliances. Pick a CMS solution, like a headless API-first CMS, that has robust APIs and lets you easily connect with third-party tools.

Visualize and Organize Your Website Correctly

One of the first things you should do when you’re implementing a new CMS or rolling out a redesign is to bring all of your stakeholders into a room and gather their input. Failing to plan is planning to fail. Half the battle is developing a well-thought-out content organization and taxonomy that helps your business meet its goals to succeed.

error: Content is protected !!